The Cowsills – in memory of Barry Cowsill

Barry Cowsill, the group’s bassist, had been missing in New Orleans since the hurricane in September, but this week his body was identified.

I originally posted this record a while back – by odd coincidence I found this 45 in New Orleans last year. I’ll repeat it in his memory, especially as these are rare tracks never put on any Cowsills cd that I know of.

The first incarnation of the Cowsills consisted of four brothers, Bill, Bob, Barry and John, from Rhode Island, managed by their dad.

“All I Really Wanta Be Is Me” / “And the Next Day Too” was their first 45, very fine folky teen garage, released on Johnny Nash’s Joda label. Supposedly it was the only record on which they played the instruments instead of studio musicians until they recorded their “In Concert” lp in 1969.

When this 45 was recorded in 1965, Barry would have been only 10 or 11 years old. Within a couple of years the Cowsills went pop with their mom Barbara and sister Susan singing along.

5 thoughts on “The Cowsills – in memory of Barry Cowsill”

  1. I loved the Cowsill’s. I discovered them in the 1970’s when a pre teen.
    I am saddened by Bill and Barry passing away. And it is sad that Richard
    was booted out of the group by their father. Their harmonies were the best
    ever.

  2. The 4 piece was great – 4 part harmony. I saw them ’66 at the Warren (RI) Canteen first, after that opening for someone (Rascals?) at RI Auditorium where they did an incredible version of Paperback Writer with all live vocal – no echo. I had a band from Bristol called the Ruju Kast. We played a lot of Navy bases and clubs in RI. Our manager got us an audition at the Cowsills rehearsal place (at their ‘compound’) in Newport. They hired us for a few dates at their club in Newport called ‘Bambi’s’

  3. The four-piece used to play around Brown University at fraternity and dorm parties – and yes, they were amazingly excellent. Their playing was rock solid and their vocals were outstanding. There was an early hit, “Most of All,” which must have broken only in New England – whenever I mention it blank stares follow. Worth finding and checking out.

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