The Villains


left to right Steve Hacker (bass), Larry Mattingly (rhythm guitar, vocals), Alan Hoover (lead guitar, backup vocals), Roger Walker (drums, vocals), Bob Ledbetter (lead vocalist)
 

The Villains first 45, “Don’t Ever Leave Me” is a classic, featuring some of the most savage screams in garage music.

The Villains were long thought to be from Tennessee because their records were on the Bullet label from Nashville, but after hearing from lead guitarist and co-founder Alan Hoover, I can confirm they were from Evansville, Indiana, just 150 miles north of Nashville. Their records were produced by Leon Beaver (a country singer himself) and Jack Bulleit (the son of Jim Bulleit).

Here’s their story as told to me by Alan:

Actually, we spelled Villains correctly (after looking it up!), but many people put the a/i in the wrong order, including the guys at Bullet Records. Jim Bulleit (“pronounced Bullet”) of Nashville was the producer/owner of Bullet. He attempted to revive the label with our record, but I don’t know if he ever did get it going.

Anyway, the folk classic “Shortenin’ Bread” was the “A” side of our first record, not “Don’t Ever Leave Me”. Shortenin’ Bread acheived number one in Evansville, IN, for a good run, and also other towns in the area. We had to play it 2 or 3 times a gig or they wouldn’t let us leave. Really! Don’t Ever Leave Me was also locally popular, but much less so than Shortenin’ Bread. Also, Shortenin’ Bread was a 4-star pick hit in Cashbox Magazine, and (we were told by Bulleit) “broke” in the Tallahassee, Florida market and some other markets. I have also been told by several people over the years that the Bullwinkle cartoon show featured it in an episode, but I have never personally verified that. We actually heard it on an Astronauts (Boulder CO) record as a rock song in ’63, and thought we could improve on it.

Here is some history of the band:

Bob Ledbetter (Led) and I started the Villains in our hometown of Evansville, Indiana, in summer of 1963 (after we graduated from high school), with Roger Walker, a local drummer (we had no bass yet). I was lead guitar, taught Led some rhythm. Led was also our lead singer. We started playing beer parties, dances, etc. I went to college that fall, and Bob met Larry Mattingly (Midget), a local E’ville guitar player who sang good backup. They continued the band during the ’63/’64 school year, adding Bob’s girlfriend Julia Hadad for backup harmony and sex appeal. Still no bass guitar. Then, I quit college, came back in the summer of ’64.

We practiced all day all summer and fall in Bob’s basement, improving our chops. In the fall of ’64, we picked up Steve Hacker, a local bass player. We played loud, solid rock, and crowds were attracted to the atmosphere that we created. Our reputation kept increasing, and we became the top local band. We had lots of fans/friends around the area. We were known for inciting rowdy behavior with our music, particularly if beer was running freely. The “Villains” name fit, although we chose it largly because we were from “the ‘ville”. We were definitely one of the party bands of all time, I’m not exaggerating either. Larry and Led had a natural comedic talent, which added to the showy aspects of the band. (They formed a “Led and Larry” duo for about 10 years after the Villains broke up, also known for inciting rowdiness.)

In ’65, we got a new drummer, Pat Ziemer, from another local band (The Aragons). Also, we picked up Bruce Blythe, a local keyboard player, from the same band. Bruce and my brother Mike Hoover (now a doctor in Evansville) wrote “Don’t Ever Leave Me”. We actually recorded Shortnin’ Bread/Don’t Ever Leave me in late summer of ’65 in Nashville, after Jim Bulleit saw us and liked what we were doing. He personally auditioned us in Evansville, and had us to his house for a cookout immediately after we recorded Shortenin’ Bread etc. He mentioned that he was reviving the label after being out of the business for some years.

It quickly became #1 in E’ville. A local DJ started managing our bookings, and we were playing all over the southern Indiana/Illinois, northern Kentucky area, with Shortenin’ Bread boosting our visibility in the area. We also regularly played fraternity parties in Evansville, IU (Bloomington IN) and Vanderbilt (Nashville), as well as numerous Louisville and Indinapolis gigs. Fraternities always asked us back, for obvious reasons.

Bruce Blythe had other ambitions, and left later in ’65. We picked up Danny Brown, another local keyboard player, to replace Bruce. In ’66, we recorded a Gary Bugg song called “Love is the Treasure”, our second record, and we put “Midnight Hour” on there too (actually the “A” side). Danny and Garry Bugg both came from another Evansville band, The Circles. We recorded that in the basement of a funeral home in Evansville!


The Passions (l-r): Althea Mitchell, Sandy King, Cynthia Bennet

In 1967, a local Supremes tribute group called “The Passions” joined us, as we started playing more and more soul. They were Cynthia Bennett (lead singer), Althea Mitchell, and Sandy King. These girls danced, sang, looked great in short dresses, and the crowds loved them. They liked our white soul, and sat in on a couple gigs. They were sweethearts. Everybody liked them, so we made them part of the band. About that time, we joined Triangle Talent of Louisville, KY, who put us into many venues that we didn’t previously have access to.We pretty much split up in ’67 or ’68, with Larry and me quitting. Led, Dan, a new drummer (Tommy Thompson), and Steve Hacker teamed up with super guitar player Denny Browder (who is said to have refused a membership with Chicago because of fear of flying), along with Cynthia of the Passions and formed a touring band. They might have called themselves The Villains, but no one can recall.

In 1984, we decided to do a 20-year reunion in Evansville, with Led, me, Larry, Pat, Danny, and Steve (our serious party lineup). It went over big, with all the original members showing up to jam. We continued this every year until 1997 with good crowds. The rowdiness would always recur, even though many of the audience were entirely too old to be behaving in such a manner. But, they couldn’t help themselves! Then, Led had a stroke Christmas Eve of 1997 at the young age of 52. The stroke damaged Led’s speech, and he can no longer sing. So, that sadly ended the Villains. He can still make me fall over laughing though, he is such a natural comic.

Everybody went on to have families, etc., some in professional fields. I became an engineer, designed, patented, and now make and sell a guitar invention called the Sustainiac, that produces infinite sustain for guitar. (Sustainiac.com) Larry Mattingly and Pat Ziemer are in sales, Danny Brown a counselor, Roger Walker a hairdresser, Steve Hacker still playing bass I think, Bruce is doing well as a nationally recognized consultant with business on dealing with catastrophic events. Cynthia Bennet became a nurse, but I don’t know about Althea Mitchell or Sandy King. I hope I got all the facts right.

Thank you Alan for your input and the great photos.


“Photo taken at the Surf Club (a regular Friday gig for us for a couple of years): Danny Brown (right, keyboards) and Pat Ziemer (our main drummer for most of our run) are shown in this picture.
We would pack the place with 400-500 people, and it got loud and rowdy without fail. Most of our old fans recall the Surf Club as some of the most fun of their youth years. By the way, Pat would usually stand on his drums during Shortnin’ Bread, and never fell off that I can remember!” – Alan Hoover

42 thoughts on “The Villains”

  1. great tracks, Love is the Treasure is on the (very nice but no info) comp Strange World (Lee’s Garage Sector), Midnight Hour’s allright and Don’t Ever Leave me is just the way I love… thanks a lot!

    PS: In case you’ll visit the vinyl-convention in Holland, Utrecht, maybe we could meet there….

  2. I played in the Villains as keyboard player (2nd record). Farfisa organ! The bass player, Steve Hacker, provided the screams on “Don’t ever Leave me”. The name on the first record is a common mispelling. The correct spelling is Villains, not villians.
    Thanks for remembering. a real treat.
    Dan

  3. I’m Midget’s daughter. This is such a nice tribute to you all! The photos are great and I love reading the stories on here. The “V’s” are in my heart and blood. Hope you are doing well, Danny.

  4. steve is still in evansville. he called me out of the blue one sunday night at 3 am he might have a little to much to drink. but it was good to talk to him.
    charlie

  5. Hi there…I’m Tom Thompson, the third drummer for the band…I’m so happy I stumbled onto this site…The photos and recollections brought back a lot of good memories…Now if only I can find someone to remember the 70′s for me!…After working for many years as a musician in NY, I switched careers and became an elephant trainer for 20 years (it was the only job I could find that was more stupid than being in a band)…My wife and I are now semi-retired and live in Tucson where I once again work in bands…Hi Dan!…Hi guys!…Where is Hacker anyway?…..t

  6. Regarding the post-band activities of members of the disbanded “Villains” I would have to check with another source but do know that after their ’67-’68 breakup I had been playing in various club,concert,garage groups with my friend and recent best man at my ’67 wedding, “super” guitar player Denny Browder. He was an inspiration to me for several years of groups. Sometime in that short span Denny and myself teamed with Led and Hacker for local gigs and rehearsed at Hacker’s folks place on the north side of Evansville. It must have been early ’69 or late ’68.

    Our then manager, Jim Huser (now deceased), had submitted some garage material to Marshal Chess of Chess Records in Chicago, who on the weight of one of Denny’s songs, offered us a contract and signing bonus upon presenting additional material for follow up consideration. We did some additional (truly bad) impromptu stuff on tape at a studio in Bruceville, IN run by another local longtime challenger to the Villains, the Corvettes (aka Free Reign).

    In the meantime, our manager, Jim, had gone to New York to attempt pushing us off to anyone else interested in the same demo he presented to Chess. Oddly enough he got a “I’ll give you 2 minutes” kind of response from Jack (?escapes me for the moment) who was the producer at that time for recent RCA Victor acquisition “The Guess Who” from Toronto. He listened to the tape, noting particularly the same song that caught Marshal Chess’ attention and that afternoon we received a call at Hacker’s home during a practice session strongly suggesting we be in Manhattan, NY the next day. As it was non-negotiable from Jim’s perspective we packed a trailer and headed out. Oh if I had time to relate the stories from that point, which took us eventually back to the east coast to Boston, MA to be close to RCA to renegotiate & playing in Mass. and back in the Midwest as well for a short time.

    Upon arrival in N.Y. we were put up by RCA in a New Jersey Holiday Inn, after they recorded and mastered the “A” side (12 studio hours) for a record they were (according to RCA V.P. Don Burkheimer- also closely involved with the Guess Who at the time) to promote to at least a no. 3 spot on Billboard’s top 100 while sending us on tour with Guess Who. This was in studio “B” (Jefferson Airplane, Count Basie, Youngbloods and others) We were quite awed at all the events happening so fast.

    At the session were Bob Ledbetter, Steve Hacker, myself (drums), Denny Browder, and quickly appropriated musician/friends from Minneapolis (Rick Warneke/O’dell- tenor sax/vocals) and from Chicago (Bob Dompier- trumpet/vocals). Led lost his voice during vocal takes (Shortnin’ Bread wasn’t the only number that found Bob’s vociferous, screaming vocals). We went to a nearby drugstore I recall and purchased whatever might help. We ended up with a bottle of Listerine. Bob DRANK the entire bottle (which certainly was not his preferred brand- PBR). Oddly enough it worked. The final mix was pretty awesome as I recall.

    Now is where a correction might be appropriate. Alan Hoover, in relating the information you have, spoke of Denny turning down a “Chicago” offer. Urban myth, but not totally unworthy. Denny grew up in Arlington Heights, a west Chicago suburb and started high school w/ Chicago’s (then called Chicago Transit Authority) guitarist Terry Kath. Denny learned a lot from Terry but they parted ways before the group actually hit the super big time. It was over a girlfriend of Denny’s that apparently Terry took an interest in. Maybe Denny should have hung around? Denny told me that they would have never needed anyone other than Terry.

    Anyway, upon talking with excited RCA elite it was found that Denny preferred touring with a bus rather than by airplane. This would have left us most probably late arriving to open for Guess Who at concerts since, obviously, they flew. Believe it or not, this is the incident which ended in a sort of tragedy in that RCA never did allow for renegotiations with our attempts to get back in the door.

    Denny and I flew out of Evansville a year or so later enroute to San Fransisco to audition for jobs with “Sopwith Camel”. Did he get over his fear of airplanes? No, and I didn’t ever know about N.Y. until our manager, Jim Huser, moved back to the area from years in Minneapolis and clued me in. On the S.F. flight via St. Louis Denny was petrified. We waited for several flights which we could have taken, but Denny ended up taking a bus back. I flew back.

    I also played in another local band, “Chaos” w/ mentioned drummer Tommy Thompson. I also played rhythm guitar. I don’t recall that collaberation of Denny and Tommy and others prior to our RCA venture, but it could be accurate. I’ll talk to Denny. I do have the basement tapes of several songs recorded in Led’s parents basement (recorded by Alan Hoover) prior to our trip to Boston. I have them in digital files if interested. A friend actually posted them on a link (obscure)on the internet some time back.

  7. Awesome story. It’s hard to believe all this was taking place within the first few years of my life.

    Don’t know if you are aware or not, Uncle Bob (Ledbetter) is living in Texas (after his stroke and the death of his mother) to be near his daughter, Lisa. I know both my father, Larry, and I would love to have a copy of the digital recordings. My dad just came back from Texas from visiting Uncle Bob and it sure would be nice to share them with him on the next trip.

    Please keep the stories flowing. Love reading this.

  8. I am Bob’s daughter and I wanted to tell you all that he is doing great!

    Roger Griffin & Larry Mattingly have been to Houston to see us! We had a ball breaking out the Guitars and Rocking Down like the old days. Bob’s address in Houston is 2100 Tanglewidle unit 327 Houston, 77063. He would love to hear from you. Although the stroke was massive 10 years ago, he can still sing and has never lost the special personality that we all love.

    Please send us an email. It gives my sweet Dad a deal of great joy.

    Much Love to all..

    Lisa Ann & Bob

  9. Life is truly an amazing adventure and finding this website is a blast from the past. I found it doing a search for Denny Browder mentioned in Steve Shelton’s post. Many thanks to Chas Kit for his great post of Alan Hoover’s story.

    Growing up in Evansville, I remember the Villains quite well. They played a sock-hop when I was a student at Central High School and I became a fan. The Villians played with a lot of passion and soul, and Led was a powerful vocalist. I still have my copy of their rockin’ cover of “Midnight Hour” with the B-side of “Love is the Treasure,” written by Gary Bugg. I never knew Gary, but I did go out with his sister Susie.

    The picture of the female trio “Passions” is priceless for me, as I was a classmate of Althea Mitchell in elementary school. I never knew of her vocal abilities and haven’t seen her for over 40 years.

    I was never in a rock-n-roll band but had a passion for music. I was familiar with most of the popular local Evansville bands and the names mentioned here bring back a lot of memeories. Even I knew of the recording studio in the basement of Johann Funeral Home.

    In reference to Steve Shelton’s post: I knew little about his musical history but remember him as a great guy. Steve was a friend and neighbor in the early 70′s.

    I moved away from Evansville in 1975 and haven’t been back much in the past 20 years. In searching for Alan Hoover’s “Sustainiac”, I found he and I now live in the same town. I called him up and we spoke briefly. He was kind enough to indulge me in some reminiscing about days gone by.

    Ahh, the 60′s. What a great time for garage bands!

  10. As I read this, I kept looking for my name, and finally realized that you’re describing a separate but very similar trip to New York to record at RCA. The session I was involved with was very similar to the one you describe .. it included Bob Ledbetter, Denny Browder, Steve Hacker, and Rick O’Dell, but I think the drummer on that trip was another Minneapolis guy whose name I don’t remember, but I recall referring to him as ‘Link’ (as in missing link) .. a kind of hirsute fellow. I was brought along to play keyboards. This was also organized by Jim Huser, and the tune was being pitched to a Canadian producer, whose name I don’t recall.

    Our trip was apparently a bit more low-budget .. I don’t recall being put up in a hotel .. my recollection is that we stayed in the home of an acquaintance or relative of one of the guys, in Hackensack, NJ. The session was a long full day spent recording a single track .. either ‘A Letter to Sarah’ or ‘Letters to Sarah’, I can’t remember which. I think I played some organ or piano in the song, but also remember laying down a harpsichord track, since we discovered a harpsichord in the studio. The studio, of course, was amazing to us all .. a huge room and a 64-track board. I remember seeing Duke Ellington enter the building that day, and I remember us being introduced briefly to Lana Cantrell, who was also recording that day. Heady stuff.

    The whole trip was a blur, and an awesome experience for a couple of carfuls of hippies in the late 60′s. The recording, when finished, was an amazing bit of work .. but of course nothing ever came of it and I never heard the tune after leaving the studio that day. It was an amazing and unforgettable experience, but many of the details of the trip are lost to me. They say if you remember the 60s you weren’t really there .. and there’s a lot of truth to that. In any case, it was a highlight of that time of my life, and a great experience to play with the likes of Ledbetter and Browder. I played in a band or two with Hacker after that time, and perhaps you (Steve) remember the brief life of the Uncle Blue Band, with you on drums, me on guitar, Jerry England on bass and Terry Brey singing and playing harp. What a lot of fun we had in those days, with not a penny in our pockets.

    Thanks for sparking some great memories ..

  11. You mentioned the Corvettes recording studio in Bruceville, In. I recall it was Neil Long’s garage, converted to a so called studio. Milk cartons on the ceiling !!
    Neil lived in the trailer home next to it. He still lives outside Bruceville and owns Shilo Fabrication. Give him a call.

  12. Didn’t you live on W. Columbia ? I was there many times with various guys….Jeff Davis,Tyke Phillips, Roger(Milan) Dodger to name a few! Those times are also blurred, (?wonder why) but I do remember a fire place, not sure if it worked or not,but I think it did, a candle with mounds of candle drippings….and a “ziltch”!

    1. I dated Steve for 4 years and we loved each other…….then we separated……….then he died in his house fire. I am so sorry Steve. I am so sorry Steve. He needed his old friends, and we all let him die.

  13. BOBBY, WE MISS YOU TERRIBLY, I HAVE BEEN LOOKING FOR YOU EVERY WHERE I CANNOT BELIEVE STEVE IS GONE, I WILL BE IN
    EVANSVILLE THIS WEEKEND PLEASE CONTACT ME, LOVE YOU
    JANICE, LEZLI, TERESA

  14. THOSE DAYS SEEM LIKE YESTERDAY WHEN WE WERE AT THE CORNER OF
    POWELL AND PARRETT AT THE KITCHEN TABLE WITH LEZLI EATING THE GERANIUMS AND ASKING STEVE TO CRACK THE WINDOW BECAUSE IT WAS HOT AND HE PUT HIS ELBOW THRU THE GLASS. YOU WILL BE MISSED MY
    FRIEND.

  15. I have tried to keep up with all the guys. So glad Bobby Led is doing good. Give him love and hugs….We will all miss Steve….Ramona

  16. What a tragedy. I heard on the news about the House Fire on Old State Road, but just recently found out that it was Steve Hacker. I played in a few local bands around the time that The Villains were already started. They were the first well known local band that I can remember. I played in The Nomads, The Misfits, and briefly with Chaos, but I remember those days (even if it was a little hazy). My deepest condolences to the Hacker family for their loss. I even played some music occasionally with Steve over the years. He will be greatly missed.

  17. Lisa,
    Just wondering if you are the Lisa I went to school with at Hebron Elementary. If so I would love to know how you have been. With the popularity of FaceBook several people have been asking about you. Dave

  18. Jerry Velders… How are you these days? Where are you these days? Hadn’t been on this site for a while and just happened to log back on. You know I didn’t live at the Columbia St. place, must have been some common friends at the time. I recall the trip where we stayed at the Doctor’s place in Hackensack, NJ. It was family of one Tina’s (remember my wife?) cousins in the near N.Y. city area. She was born in Englewood Cliffs, NJ. Anyway this was, I’m guessing, the return trip? to the east coast.If it was the first trip then you were at the RCA session. I drove all night and day and was beat and remember Jack Richardson help me stay awake in the drum cubicle during the session. All I recall is that we were all about out of money and I called this folks up and they fed us all big breakfasts and the good doctor healed a few of the sick among us. It’s all so cloudy to me. I remember you were with the team that went to Bruceville, which was after the recording offer from Chess in Chicago. It’s a blackout of sorts after that. I know the first trip east (to RCA) was with Denny, myself, Hacker, Led, and Bob Dompier (trumpet) and Rick Warneke (O’Dell) on sax. And we did get put up at a Holiday across the river in NJ. You were on one of these trips? WOW! I smoked a whole bunch of that crazy tobackey back then and there are evidently some leaks in my memory. Forgive me, bro. The hirsute fellow you referred to was Bob Bellville (from NY) I did play some rhythm guitar and bass for a bit with Bob and Bobby Legate. When we reorganized for the return trip to Boston, we played in the War Zone and the Downtown Lounge and stayed in a motel in Revere Beach, MA. This was so Huser could try to renegotiate w/ RCA and Jack Richardson (The Guess Who’s producer)and we would be close to NY. We played 2 weeks and then toured rural Mass. for some gigs before returning home. Then I did some road gigs with Belleville, Dompier, Denny, Hacker, and Led. Things are jumbled, but all I know is “I think I was there”. Drop me a line some time and fill me in on the last 40 years. You were married at the time I last recall and were employed in the mental health field. How ironic things can seem looking back.

  19. Hi Roxanne: We’ve never met (I don’t think) but I still stop and talk to your Dad (you’re talking about Larry “midget” Mattingly, right? I’ll get a disc with the tapes that Alan Hoover made for us to your Dad. I know he’s been to see Led a couple times a year recently and once with Roger Griffin? Says they have a great time playing acoustics and hummin’ and singin’ together. Lot of fun. Thanks for the post. Sorry for the delay. Didn’t realize it had been so long since I checked the site.
    Steve S.

  20. I would like to make a correction to your comments about Bullet records on the Villians intro. My Father is Jack Bulleit and you mentioned that he was also known as Jim Bulleit which is incorrect. Jim Bulleit was my Grandfather who founded Bullet records in 1946(the year Jack was born) after spending many years as the announcer of the Grand Ole’ Opry during WW2. He was also one of the promoters/announcers for the Lousiana Hay Ride. I have heard many stories about trying to get Hank Williams Sr. sobered up enough to go on stage! Jim was also the first person to record B.B. King in June of 1949. He was also partners w/ Sam Phillips at Sun Records for a while before Sam and his brother bought him out about a year before Elvis was allowed to record(no one there could stand him B.B. King had once told me that “they weren’t the only ones of that opinion”). He also was the owner of J.B. records as well. I am sure if you ask the Members of the band that were at the cook out, they would be able to back that up. I am very proud of my families contributions to the music industry. In the early 50′s Jim was a pioneer in Rock and Roll, recording many of the black artists playing blues, and rock and roll before white artists re-recorded those songs and it actually became rock and roll. Our Family record collection is now in storage in the archives of the Country Music Hall of Fame in Nashville.

  21. WOW what a blast from the past, Bobby and Larry have been on my mind a lot as we are all getting older, wondered what ever happened to them, ask your dad if he remembers Diana from Muncie Indiana, and the lounge in the bowling alley they played every weekend for a long time. have some great photos if he’s interested.
    sorry to hear about his stroke but glad he is doing ok. Would love to give a shout out to Larry too, if you are still in contact with him.
    Diana Shenberger/Harrington.

  22. I’m so tickled that there is a thread that supports our memories… that we were, indeed, alive, and involved! Good for you that you are part of this fabric!Now I realize I never DREAMED it. It truly happened. Ya’ll are great!

  23. I too played music with Danny Brown I’m originally from Henderson Ky. Now in Colorado. I came from a band called The Lavendar Hill Mob.

  24. WOW this is absolutely amazing and my thanks to Lynne for sending it to me!! I see all of my girls are here Ramona,Janice, Lezli, and little Teresa. Makes me smile and think about all of the crazy things we did and what a journey this life has been. Thanks to all of you for being in my life and love you all very much! The Villains will Rock forever and best wishes to Led!!!!! Rick

  25. Went to see the Villains many times in the 60s and Yes, their shows always were exciting. Read Steve Shelton’s comments here and they brought back some great memories for me. I was in The Sausage Mill Band with Steve and later, Steve and I were in Gandalf with Denny Browder. Jeff Davis was the bass player for Sausage Mill band. I still front a band, Touch of Grey. which includes Denny Browder on guitar.

  26. My brother Tom Thompson passed away on Feb. 6th, 2013 in Tucson.
    I remmber when he found this site. He was so excited to hear about all the friends from those days.

    1. Bob, led, was everyone’s best bud. He was the finest person I have ever known. He will be with us forever, Roger Griffin

  27. I had a helluva time frequently being around those guys. I became especially close to “Midget” and have seen him frequently over the years.

    I can remember making many trips to the “stalk” (short for cornstalk) in the wee hours of the morning on many occasions with Led and Larry among others, to consume massive amounts of alcohol and listen to them strum their guitars. That was in the summer of ’64.

    The “stalk” was located in Warrick Co. just north,of what is now the Lloyd Expressway, on Grimm Rd. or Frame Rd. Everyone would park on the old gravel road, and hang out there on the road for hours. I suppose that place was chosen because it was remote, at the time, and hidden from view of cops, because of the growing corn. I’ll always cherish those memories.

    Rest in peace Led.

    1. Led. Tosh, and I were best friends. I,m sure a lot of people felt that way about him. We had a life of memories, best buds since kindergarten. Think of him everyday, Roger Griffin

  28. Led. Tosh, and I were best friends. I,m sure a lot of people felt that way about him. We had a life of memories, best buds since kindergarten. Think of him everyday, Roger Griffin

  29. Hello,

    I’m Sandra(Sandy)King-Black’s daughter and she is doing great. We live in Dallas Texas and she’s been here since the 1970′s. I knew my mother did jingles at one time and sung with Althea but didn’t know she sung in an actual group. This was so great to read and I had to show everyone here at work. Thanks for remembering my mother and her friends. Does anyone have the music that included the Passions, I’d love to hear it?

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>