Category Archives: Birmingham

The Move gigs 1966-1970

Welcome to another posting of a series of gig listings for 1960s bands. None of these lists is exhaustive and my idea is to add to them in the comments section below over time. They are here for future researchers to draw on.  I have also added a few interesting bits of information and will add images in time.

I’d like to encourage band members to get in touch to share memories, or for anyone to send corrections/clarifications to my email: Warchive@aol.com 

Equally important, if you attended any of the gigs below or played in the support band, please do leave your memories below in the comments section for future historians to use. If you know of any missing gigs, please add them too, if possible, with the sources.

The Move, late 1966. Left to right: Carl Wayne, Ace Kefford, Bev Bevan, Trevor Burton and Roy Wood. From Fabulous 208 Magazine

THE MOVE:

 Carl Wayne – lead vocals

Roy Wood – guitar/vocals

Trevor Burton – guitar/vocals

Ace Kefford – bass/vocals

Bev Bevan – drums

 

1966

22 January 1966 – Carlton Club, Erdington, West Midlands with The Hellions (Birmingham Evening Mail)

 

1 February 1966 – Club Cedar, Birmingham (Birmingham Evening Mail) Billed as Carl Wayne & The Move

1 February 1966 – Carlton Club, Erdington, West Midlands (Birmingham Evening Mail) Billed as Carl Wayne & The Move

3 February 1966 – Club Cedar, Birmingham with Little Stevie Wonder (replaced P J Proby), The Sidewinders, The Sombreros and The Matadors (Birmingham Evening Mail) Billed as featuring Carl Wayne

3 February 1966 – Elbow Room, Aston, West Midlands (Birmingham Evening Mail) Billed as featuring Carl Wayne

5 February 1966 – Club Cedar, Birmingham with Doris Troy and Fantastic Bluesology Incorporated (Birmingham Evening Mail) Billed as featuring Carl Wayne

10 February 1966 – Club Cedar, Birmingham (Birmingham Evening Mail) Billed as Carl Wayne & The Move

10 February 1966 – Carlton Club, Erdington, West Midlands (Birmingham Evening Mail) Billed as featuring Carl Wayne

12 February 1966 – Marquee Club and Whisky A Go Go, Navigation Street, Birmingham (Birmingham Evening Mail)

13 February 1966 – Club Cedar, Birmingham with Jeremy & The Heartbeats (Birmingham Evening Mail) Billed as featuring Carl Wayne

15 February 1966 – Club Cedar, Birmingham with Inez and Charlie Foxx and Jeremy & The Heartbeats (Birmingham Evening Mail) Billed as featuring Carl Wayne

16 February 1966 – Club Cedar, Birmingham (Birmingham Evening Mail) Billed as Carl Wayne & The Move

19 February 1966 – Club Cedar, Birmingham with Monopoly (Birmingham Evening Mail) Billed as featuring Carl Wayne

20-21 February 1966 – Club Cedar, Birmingham with Doris Troy and Bluesology Incorporated (Birmingham Evening Mail) Billed as Carl Wayne & The Move

22 February 1966 – Club Cedar, Birmingham with Deke Arlon (Birmingham Evening Mail) Backed Deke Arlon for a week and billed as The Move featuring Carl Wayne

24 February 1966 – Hereford Lounge, Yardley, West Midlands (Birmingham Evening Mail) Billed as featuring Carl Wayne

 

5 March 1966 – Marquee Club, Birmingham with The Shakedown Sound (Birmingham Evening Mail)

5 March 1966 – Plaza Ballroom, Handsworth, West Midlands (Birmingham Evening Mail)

7 March 1966 – The Belfry, Wishaw, West Midlands with John Bull Breed and The Sombreros (Birmingham Evening Mail) Billed as featuring Carl Wayne

16 March 1966 – Plaza Ballroom, Handsworth, West Midlands (Birmingham Evening Mail)

24 March 1966 – Carlton Club, Erdington, West Midlands (Birmingham Evening Mail)

26 March 1966 – Le Metro Club, Birmingham (Birmingham Evening Mail)

29 March 1966 – Carlton Club, Erdington, West Midlands (Birmingham Evening Mail)

 

1 April 1966 – Marquee, Wardour Street, Soho, London with Gary Farr & The T-Bones (Tony Bacon’s book: London Live) London debut

2 April 1966 – Plaza Ballroom, Handsworth, West Midlands with William’s Conquers (Birmingham Evening Mail) Billed as Carl Wayne & The Move

5 April 1966 – Chalet Country Club, Rednal, West Midlands (Birmingham Evening Mail)

7 April 1966 – Marquee, Wardour Street, Soho, London with The Mark Leeman Five (Tony Bacon’s book: London Live)

9 April 1966 – Le Metro Club, Birmingham (Birmingham Evening Mail)

18 April 1966 – Club Cedar, Birmingham with Cleo Laine and Danny King (Birmingham Evening Mail)

19 April 1966 – Tito’s Club, Handsworth, West Midlands (Birmingham Evening Mail)

20 April 1966 – Lyndon, Sheldon, West Midlands (Birmingham Evening Mail) Billed as Carl Wayne & The Move

23 April 1966 – Ritz Ballroom, King’s Heath, West Midlands with The Steampacket Show (Birmingham Evening Mail)

26-27 April 1966 – Club Cedar, Birmingham with D D Warwick (Birmingham Evening Mail) DD Warwick may have been replaced by Dakota Station and The Johnny Patrick Trio

28 April 1966 – Hereford Lounge, Yardley, West Midlands (Birmingham Evening Mail)

 

1 May 1966 – Plaza Ballroom, Handsworth, West Midlands with The Craig (Birmingham Evening Mail)

1 May 1966 – Ritz Ballroom, King’s Heath, West Midlands with The Craig (Birmingham Evening Mail)

2-3 May 1966 – Club Cedar, Birmingham with Julie Grant, Danny King and Deep Feeling (Birmingham Evening Mail)

6 May 1966 – West End Club, Coalville, Leicestershire with Listen (Leicester Mercury) Billed as Carl Wayne & The Move

13 May 1966 – Marquee, Wardour Street, Soho, London with Sands (Tony Bacon’s book: London Live)

27 May 1966 – Marquee, Wardour Street, Soho, London with Sands (Tony Bacon’s book: London Live)

 

2 June 1966 – Marquee, Wardour Street, Soho, London with The Triad (Tony Bacon’s book: London Live)

23 June 1966 – Marquee, Wardour Street, Soho, London with The Rift (Tony Bacon’s book: London Live)

 

3 July 1966 – Tavern Club, East Dereham, Norfolk (Fabulous 208)

6 July 1966 – Club Cedar, Birmingham with The Stringbeats and The Nightriders (Birmingham Evening Mail)

7 July 1966 – Marquee, Wardour Street, Soho, London with Sands (Tony Bacon’s book: London Live)

8 July 1966 – Coronation Inn, Ramsgate, Kent (Fabulous 208)

9 July 1966 – Dungeon Club, Nottingham (website: https://dungeonmods.wordpress.com/)

10 July 1966 – Dereham Tavern, Dereham, Norfolk with Ian & Danny Eves with Sounds Reformed (Eastern Evening News)

12 July 1966 – Adam & Eve, Southampton, Hampshire (Fabulous 208)

13 July 1966 – Disco Blue Club, Ryde, Isle of Wight (Fabulous 208)

14 July 1966 – Marquee, Wardour Street, Soho, London with Bluesology (Tony Bacon’s book: London Live)

16 July 1966 – Birdcage, Eastney, Hampshire (Dave Allen research)

17 July 1966 – The Downs, Hassocks, West Sussex (Fabulous 208)

21 July 1966 – Marquee, Wardour Street, Soho, London with The Ultimate (Tony Bacon’s book: London Live)

22 July 1966 – Birdcage, Eastney, Hampshire (Dave Allen research)

26 July 1966 – Chalet Country Club, Rednal, West Midlands (Birmingham Evening Mail)

28 July 1966 – Marquee, Wardour Street, Soho, London with The Herd (Tony Bacon’s book: London Live)

2 August 1966 – Birdcage, Eastney, Hampshire with Jimmy James & The Vagabonds (Dave Allen research)

4 August 1966 – Marquee, Wardour Street, Soho, London with Sands (Tony Bacon’s book: London Live)

11 August 1966 – Marquee, Wardour Street, Soho, London with Bluesology (Tony Bacon’s book: London Live)

13 August 1966 – Birdcage, Eastney, Hampshire (Dave Allen research)

14 August 1966 – Starlight Ballroom, Wembley, London (Fabulous 208)

18 August 1966 – Marquee, Wardour Street, Soho, London with Sands (Tony Bacon’s book: London Live)

20 August 1966 – Co-op, Rainbow Suite, Birmingham with Bent Society (Birmingham Evening Mail)

25 August 1966 – Marquee, Wardour Street, Soho, London (Tony Bacon’s book: London Live)

 

3 September 1966 – Starlight Ballroom, Boston Gliderdrome, Boston, Lincolnshire with Zuider Lee and Ray King Soul Band (Lincolnshire Standard)

4 September 1966 – Downs Hotel, Hassocks, West Sussex (Fabulous 208)

8 September 1966 – Marquee, Wardour Street, Soho, London with MI5 (Tony Bacon’s book: London Live)

9 September 1966 – Rialto Ballroom, Derby (Fabulous 208)

10 September 1966 – Burlesque, Leicester (Fabulous 208)

11 September 1966 – Nottingham Boat Club, Nottingham (Down at the Boat book)

15 September 1966 – Marquee, Wardour Street, Soho, London with The Bo Street Runners (Tony Bacon’s book: London Live)

16 September 1966 – Jigsaw, Manchester (Manchester Evening Mail)

17 September 1966 – Dreamland Ballroom, Margate, Kent (Melody Maker)

19 September 1966 – Ricky Tick, Hounslow, London (Melody Maker)

22 September 1966 – Marquee, Wardour Street, Soho, London with Julian Covey & The Machine (Tony Bacon’s book: London Live)

23 September 1966 – Birdcage, Eastney, Hampshire (Dave Allen research)

24 September 1966 – Dreamland, Margate, Kent with The Epics (East Kent Times)

25 September 1966 – Ricky Tick, Hounslow, London (Fabulous 208)

29 September 1966 – Marquee, Wardour Street, Soho, London with The Syn (Tony Bacon’s book: London Live)

30 September 1966 – Birdcage, Eastney, Hampshire (Dave Allen research)

6 October 1966 – Marquee, Wardour Street, Soho, London with The Embers (Tony Bacon’s book: London Live)

7 October 1966 – Birdcage, Eastney, Hampshire (Dave Allen research)

13 October 1966 – Marquee, Wardour Street, Soho, London with Sands (Tony Bacon’s book: London Live)

14 October 1966 – Birdcage, Eastney, Hampshire (Dave Allen research)

15 October 1966 – Leeds University, Leeds, West Yorkshire (Fabulous 208)

20 October 1966 – Marquee, Wardour Street, Soho, London with Bluesology (Tony Bacon’s book: London Live)

21 October 1966 – Birdcage, Eastney, Hampshire with The Action (Dave Allen research)

21 October 1966 – The Marquee Show, Fairfield Hall, Croydon, London with The Spencer Davis Group, Jimmy James & The Vagabonds, Wynder K Frog, The Herd and The VIPs (Chris Broom book: Rockin’ and Around Croydon)

22 October 1966 – Chelmsford Corn Exchange, Chelmsford, Essex with support (Southend Standard)

23 October 1966 – Technical College, Brighton, West Sussex (Fabulous 208)

27 October 1966 – Marquee, Wardour Street, Soho, London with The Good-Goods (Tony Bacon’s book: London Live)

28 October 1966 – Birdcage, Eastney, Hampshire (Dave Allen research)

29 October 1966 – College of Technology, Brighton, West Sussex (Fabulous 208)

 

4 November 1966 – Walsall Town Hall, Walsall, West Midlands with New Vaudeville Band, The Staffords and The Ambassadors (Express & Star)

5 November 1966 – Hull University, Hull (Fabulous 208)

6 November 1966 – Jigsaw, Manchester (Manchester Evening News and Chronicle)

9 November 1966 – Orford Cellar, Norwich (Eastern Evening News)

17 November 1966 – Marquee, Wardour Street, Soho, London with Dave Antony’s Moods (Tony Bacon’s book: London Live)

19 November 1966 – Technical College, Harlow, Essex (Fabulous 208)

19 November 1966 – King Mojo, Sheffield, South Yorkshire with Ben E King (The Star) Fabulous 208 says 20 November

24 November 1966 – Marquee, Wardour Street, Soho, London with Roscoe Brown Combo (Tony Bacon’s book: London Live)

25 November 1966 – The Thing, Oldham, Lancashire (Oldham Evening Chronicle)

26 November 1966 – Durham University, Durham (Fabulous 208)

27 November 1966 – Golden Torch, Tunstall, Staffordshire (Fabulous 208)

29 November 1966 – Town Hall, Aylesbury, Bucks (Fabulous 208)

 

3 December 1966 – Smethwick Baths, Smethwick, West Midlands with Heat Wave (Birmingham Evening Mail)

4 December 1966 – Belle Vue, New Elizabethan, Manchester with The Klyx (Manchester Evening News and Chronicle)

11 December 1966 – Dungeon Club, Nottingham (Nottingham Evening Post)

15 December 1966 – Civic Hall, Guildford, Surrey (Fabulous 208)

15 December 1966 – Speakeasy, W1, London (Fabulous 208/Mick Capewell’s Marmalade Skies website) Opening night

20 December 1966 – Civic Hall, Grays, Essex (Fabulous 208)

22 December 1966 – Top Rank Suite, Chesterfield, Derbyshire (Fabulous 208)

23 December 1966 – Il Rondo, Leicester, Leicestershire (Fabulous 208)

26 December 1966 – Locarno Ballroom, Bristol (Fabulous 208)

28 December 1966 – Locarno, Stevenage, Hertfordshire (Fabulous 208)

29 December 1966 – Locarno, Streatham, London (Fabulous 208)

30 December 1966 – Carousel Club, Farnborough, Hampshire (Fabulous 208)

31 December 1966 – Trade Hall, Watford, Hertfordshire (Fabulous 208)

31 December 1966 – Roundhouse, Chalk Farm, London (Fabulous 208)

1967

1 January 1967 – Upper Cut, Forest Gate with The Mack Sound (Melody Maker)

6 January 1967 – Civic and Wulfrun Halls, Wolverhampton, West Midlands with The ‘N’ Betweens, The Soul Seekers, Parchment People and Prim ‘N’ Proper (Express & Star)

7 January 1967 – Cliffs Pavilion, Southend, Essex with The Fingers and The Tender Trap (Southend Standard)

7 January 1967 – Club Nevada, Market Hall, Redhill, Surrey (Caterham Weekly Press)

8 January 1967 – Starlite, Greenford, London (Melody Maker)

10 January 1967 – Winter Gardens, Malvern, Worcestershire (Fabulous 208)

13 January 1967 – Corn Exchange, Leicester, Leicestershire (Fabulous 208)

14 January 1967 – Worcester College of Further Education, Worcester, Worcestershire (Fabulous 208)

15 January 1967 – Black Cat, Gravesend, Kent (Fabulous 208)

18 January 1967 – Stevenage Mecca, Locarno, Stevenage, Hertfordshire (website: http://www.coda-uk.co.uk/60’s_music_scene.htm)

20 January 1967 – Aberdeen University, Aberdeen, Scotland (Fabulous 208)

21-22 January 1967 – Maryland Ballroom, Glasgow, Scotland (Fabulous 208)

23 January 1967 – Queen’s Ballroom, Wolverhampton, West Midlands (Fabulous 208)

25 January 1967 – Dorothy Ballroom, Cambridge with The Breed (Cambridge News)

26 January 1967 – Salisbury City Hall, Salisbury, Wiltshire with Soul Foundation (Hold Tight book)

27 January 1967 – Dungeon Club, Nottingham (website: https://dungeonmods.wordpress.com/)

2 February 1967 – Worthing Pavilion, Worthing, West Sussex (Record Mirror)

3 February 1967 – Tiles, Oxford Street, London with The Gods (Melody Maker)

4 February 1967 – Watford Trade Hall, Watford, Hertfordshire (Record Mirror)

5 February 1967 – Flamingo, Wardour Street, Soho, London (Record Mirror)

5 February 1967 – Iron Curtain Club, St Mary’s Cray, London (Fabulous 208)

6 February 1967 – Bath Pavilion, Bath (Record Mirror)

9 February 1967 – Locarno Ballroom, Coventry, West Midlands (Record Mirror)

10 February 1967 – Top Spot, Ross on Wye, Herefordshire (Record Mirror)

11 February 1967 – Manchester University, Manchester (Record Mirror)

12 February 1967 – 2X2 Club, Halifax, West Yorkshire (Record Mirror)

12 February 1967 – King Mojo, Sheffield, South Yorkshire with The Amboy Dukes (The Star)

13 February 1967 – Town Hall, High Wycombe, Bucks (Record Mirror)

14 February 1967 – Lotus Ballroom, Forest Gate, London (Record Mirror)

15 February 1967 – Town Hall, Battersea, London (Fabulous 208)

16 February 1967 – Skyline Ballroom, Hull with The Mandrakes, The Dawn Breakers and Birds Groove (Hull Daily Mail)

17 February 1967 – Nottingham University, Nottingham (Fabulous 208)

19 February 1967 – Agincourt Ballroom, Camberley, Surrey (Aldershot News) The club reopened on 12 February

23 February 1967 – Co-op Hall, Gravesend, Kent (Fabulous 208)

24 February 1967 – Coventry University, Coventry, West Midlands (Fabulous 208)

25 February 1967 – Imperial Ballroom, Nelson, Lancashire (Fabulous 208)

26 February 1967 – The Thing, Oldham, Lancashire (Fabulous 208)

2 March 1967 – Locarno, Derby, Derbyshire (Fabulous 208)

3 March 1967 – Tabernacle, Stockport, Greater Manchester (Fabulous 208)

4 March 1967 – Rhodes Centre, Bishop’s Stortford, Herts with Tracy’s Circles (Steve Ingless book: The Day Before Yesterday)

5 March 1967 – Saville Theatre, London (withdrew) (Record Mirror)

9 March 1967 – Locarno Ballroom, Bristol (Fabulous 208)

10 March 1967 – Queen’s College, Oxford (Fabulous 208)

11 March 1967 – Floral Hall, Southport, Lancashire (Fabulous 208)

13 March 1967 – Adelphi Ballroom, West Bromwich, West Midlands (Birmingham Evening Mail)

17 March 1967 – Tiles, Oxford Street, London with Tiles Big Band and the Knack (Melody Maker) Club’s first birthday party

18 March 1967 – Town Hall, Ealing, London (Fabulous 208)

20 March 1967 – Civic Hall, Dunstable, Bedfordshire (Fabulous 208)

22 March 1967 – Locarno, Stevenage, Herts (Fabulous 208)

23 March 1967 – Crystal Ballroom, Newcastle upon Tyne, Tyne & Wear (Fabulous 208)

24 March 1967 – Kelvin Hall, Glasgow, Scotland with The Merseybeats (Fabulous 208)

26 March 1967 – Oasis, Manchester (Manchester Evening News and Chronicle)

26 March 1967 – Drokiweeny, Manchester (Manchester Evening News and Chronicle)

27 March 1967 – Public Hall, Heacham, Norfolk (Fabulous 208)

30 March 1967 – Locarno Ballroom, Streatham, London (Fabulous 208)

 

1 April 1967 – Pearce Hall, Maidenhead, Berkshire (Fabulous 208)

6 April 1967 – King’s Hall, Belle Vue, Greater Manchester with The Tremeloes, Sounds Incorporated, Cliff Bennett & The Rebel Rousers and The Mirage (Fabulous 208)

8 April 1967 – Leas Cliff Hall, Folkestone with The Couriers (Folkestone & Hythe Gazette)

8 April 1967 – Video-London, Wolverhampton, West Midlands (Express and Star) This might just be autograph signing

9 April 1967 – Cadillac Club, Brighton, West Sussex (Melody Maker)

14 April 1967 – Brighton Arts Festival, Brighton, West Sussex with Paul Jones, Mike Stuart Span, Geno Washington, Jimmy James & The Vagabonds, Cliff Bennett & The Rebel Rousers and others (Melody Maker)

15 April 1967 – Birdcage, Eastney, Hampshire with The Academy (Dave Allen research)

21 April 1967 – Top Rank Suite, Swansea, Wales (Fabulous 208)

24 April 1967 – Belfry, Wishaw, West Midlands with Monopoly and Orange Pips (Birmingham Evening Mail)

27 April 1967 – Locarno, Newcastle upon Tyne, Tyne & Wear (Fabulous 208)

29 April 1967 – Wellington Club, Dereham, Norfolk with Rubber Band and Deep Purple (Eastern Evening News/North Norfolk News) Band opens the club

 

3 May 1967 – Bromel Club, Bromley Court Hotel, Bromley, London (Melody Maker)

6 May 1967 – Civic Hall, Nantwich, Cheshire with The Denims (Crewe Chronicle)

8 May 1967 – Silver Blades, Streatham (Sutton & Cheam Advertiser/Croydon Advertiser)

11 May 1967 – Locarno Ballroom, Coventry, West Midlands (Fabulous 208)

12 May 1967 – Cheltenham Town Hall, Cheltenham with Gopler and Mark Raymond Sound (Gloucestershire Echo)

13 May 1967 – California Ballroom, Dunstable, Bedfordshire with The Winds of Change and The Associates (website: www.california-ballroom.info/gigs/)

27 May 1967 – Hastings Pier, Hastings, East Sussex with The Flashbaks (Roger Bistow’s research at Dizzy Tiger Music website)

31 May 1967 – Top Rank Suite, Swansea, Wales (Fabulous 208)

 

1 June 1967 – Locarno Ballroom, Bristol (Fabulous 208)

3 June 1967 – Winter Gardens, Weston-Super-Mare, Somerset (Fabulous 208)

7 June 1967 – Silver Blades, Sheffield, South Yorkshire (Fabulous 208)

10 June 1967 – Corn Exchange, Kelso, Scotland (Fabulous 208)

11 June 1967 – Top Ten Club, Dundee, Scotland (Fabulous 208)

11 June 1967 – Locarno Ballroom, Montrose, Scotland (Fabulous 208)

12 June 1967 – Kinema Ballroom, Dunfermline, Scotland (Fabulous 208)

13 June 1967 – Locarno Ballroom, Glasgow, Scotland (Fabulous 208)

14 June 1967 – Douglas Hotel, Aberdeen, Scotland (Fabulous 208)

15 June 1967 – Caledonian Hotel, Inverness, Scotland (Fabulous 208)

16 June 1967 – Beachcomber Club, Irvine, Scotland (Fabulous 208)

17 June 1967 – Tofts, Folkestone, Kent (Melody Maker)

17 June 1967 – Pier, Colwyn Bay, Wales (Fabulous 208) Seems unlikely with gig above

18 June 1967 – Sunday Club, Swan, Yardley, West Midlands (Coventry Evening Telegraph)

19 June 1967 – Trinity and St John’s Oxford with Manfred Mann, Bonzo Dog Doo Dah Band, John Barnett & His Band and West Indian Steel Band (Cherwell)

24 June 1967 – Dreamland, Margate, Kent with Just Too Much (East Kent Times & Mail)

 

11 July 1967 – Marquee, Wardour Street, Soho, London with Winston’s Fumbs (Tony Bacon’s book: London Live)

13 July 1967 – Densbury College, Birmingham (Fabulous 208)

15 July 1967 – Shoreline Club, Bognor Regis, West Sussex (Fabulous 208)

21 July 1967 – Corn Exchange, Kings Lynn, Norfolk (Fabulous 208)

22 July 1967 – Cadillac Club, Brighton, West Sussex (Fabulous 208)

24 July 1967 – Stevenage Mecca, Locarno, Stevenage, Hertfordshire with The Cortinas (website: http://www.coda-uk.co.uk/60’s_music_scene.htm)

28 July 1967 – New Century Hall, Manchester (Manchester Evening News and Chronicle)

28 July 1967 – UFO, Tottenham Court Road, London (Fabulous 208)

2 August 1967 – Flamingo, Redruth, Cornwall with The Onyx (West Briton & Royal Cornish Gazette)

8 August 1967 – Lotus Ballroom, Forest Gate, London (Newham & Stratford Express)

21 August 1967 – Queen’s Ballroom, Wolverhampton, West Midlands (Express & Star)

26 August 1967 – California Ballroom, Dunstable, Bedfordshire with The Hand and The Extreme (website: www.california-ballroom.info/gigs/)

28 August 1967 – Pynkney Hall Blues Festival, Fakenham, Norfolk with Cliff Bennett & The Rebel Rousers, Alan Bown, Family and The Workshop

4 September 1967 – Silver Blades, Streatham, London (Mick Capewell’s Marmalade Skies)

13 September 1967 – Locarno, Stevenage, Herts (Fabulous 208)

16 September 1967 – Spa Royal Hall, Bridlington, East Riding of Yorkshire with Tall Storey and Colours Purple (Hull Daily Mail)

19 September 1967 – Marquee, Wardour Street, Soho, London with Timebox (Tony Bacon’s book: London Live)

30 September 1967 – Plaza Ballroom, Bearwood, West Midlands (Express & Star)

 

1 October 1967 – Starlight Ballroom, Crawley, West Sussex with Jo Jo Gunne (Crawley Advertiser)

5 October 1967 – Bradford College of Further Education, Bradford, West Yorkshire (Fabulous 208)

7 October 1967 – St George’s Ballroom, Hinckley, Leicestershire (Fabulous 208)

7 October 1967 – Plaza Ballroom, Bearwood, West Midlands (Express & Star)

9 October 1967 – Queen’s Ballroom, Wolverhampton, West Midlands with Out of The Blue (Express & Star)

11 October 1967 – Sheffield University, Sheffield, South Yorkshire (Fabulous 208)

12 October 1967 – Ritz, Bournemouth, Dorset (Bournemouth Evening Echo)

13 October 1967 – Lewes Town Hall, Lewes, West Sussex (Sussex Express and County Herald)

14 October 1967 – Nottingham University, Nottingham (Fabulous 208)

15 October 1967 – Drokiweeny, Manchester (Manchester Evening News and Chronicle)

15 October 1967 – Mr Smith’s, Manchester (Manchester Evening News and Chronicle)

17 October 1967 – Starlite Casino, Southport, Lancashire (Fabulous 208)

21 October 1967 – Gaiety Ballroom, Ramsey, Cambridgeshire with The Trax and Soul Security Corporation (website: http://peterboroughimages.co.uk/music/?p=8130)

24 October 1967 – High Wycombe Town Hall, High Wycombe, Bucks (Bucks Free Press)

27 October 1967 – Adelphi Ballroom, West Bromwich, West Midlands (Express & Star)

 

1 November 1967 – Tinned Chicken Club, York, North Yorkshire (Fabulous 208)

15 November 1967 – Bluesville, Ipswich, Suffolk (Fabulous 208)

17 November 1967 – City Hall, Sheffield, South Yorkshire (Fabulous 208)

18 November 1967 – Empire Theatre, Liverpool (Fabulous 208)

19 November 1967 – Coventry Theatre, Coventry, West Midlands (Fabulous 208)

23 November 1967 – Guildhall, Portsmouth, Hampshire (Fabulous 208)

23 November 1967 – Sophia Gardens Pavilion, Cardiff, Wales (Fabulous 208)

24 November 1967 – Colston Hall, Bristol (Fabulous 208)

25 November 1967 – Opera House, Blackpool, Lancashire (Fabulous 208)

26 November 1967 – Palais Theatre, Manchester (Fabulous 208)

 

1 December 1967 – Central Hall, Chatham, Kent (Fabulous 208)

2 December 1967 – Dome Theatre, Brighton, West Sussex (Fabulous 208)

3 December 1967 – Theatre Royal, Nottingham (Fabulous 208)

4 December 1967 – City Hall, Newcastle upon Tyne, Tyne & Wear (Fabulous 208)

5 December 1967 – Green’s Playhouse, Glasgow, Scotland (Fabulous 208)

6 December 1967 – Douglas Hotel, Aberdeen, Scotland (Fabulous 208)

7 December 1967 – Caledonian Hotel, Inverness, Scotland (Fabulous 208)

8 December 1967 – Regal Ballroom, Bennyrigg, Scotland (Fabulous 208)

9 December 1967 – Community Centre, Auchinleck, Scotland (Fabulous 208)

21 December 1967 – Palais, Nottingham (Fabulous 208)

22 December 1967 – Olympia, Kensington, London (Fabulous 208)

23 December 1967 – Axminster Guildhall, Axminster, Devon (Lyme Regis News)

23 December 1967 – Upper Cut, Forest Gate, London (Fabulous 208)

26 December 1967 – Civic Hall, Nantwich, Cheshire with The B-Jays and Frankie & The Countdowns (Crewe Chronicle)

28 December 1967 – Locarno Ballroom, Bristol (Fabulous 208)

1968

20 January 1968 – Roundhouse, Chalk Farm, London (Fabulous 208)

26 January 1968 – Coleville Grand Ballroom, Leicester (Fabulous 208)

27 January 1968 – Hastings Pier, Hastings, East Sussex with Shades of Black (Roger Bistow’s research at Dizzy Tiger Music website)

 

3 February 1968 – Plaza Ballroom, Bearwood, West Midlands (Birmingham Evening Mail)

8 February 1968 – Sophia Gardens, Cardiff, Wales with St Valentine’s Massacre and Bonzo Dog Doo Dah Band (Ron Goodway)

17 February 1968 – Kent University, Canterbury, Kent (Fabulous 208)

27 February 1968 – Marquee, Wardour Street, Soho, London with The Attack (Tony Bacon’s book: London Live)

 

5 March 1968 – High Wycombe Town Hall, High Wycombe, Bucks (Bucks Free Press)

23 March 1968 – Adelphi Ballroom, West Bromwich, West Midlands (Express & Star)

 

1 April 1968 – Belfry, Wishaw, West Midlands with The Idle Race and The Exchequers (Birmingham Evening Mail)

8 April 1968 – Silver Blades, Streatham, London (Coulson & Purley Advertiser)

12 April 1968 – Carlton Club, Warrington, Cheshire with Bits (Warrington Guardian)

Ace Kefford left around this time and Trevor Burton moved to bass

4 May 1968 – Imperial Ballroom, Nelson, Lancashire (Steve Chapples research: website: www.lankybeat.com)

4 May 1968 – City Hall, Newcastle upon Tyne, Tyne & Wear (Fabulous 208)

17 May 1968 – Clockwork Orange, Chester, Cheshire with The Magic Box (Crewe Chronicle)

25 May 1968 – Kursaal Ballroom, Southend, Essex with Crocheted Doughnut Ring (Southend Standard)

 

10 June 1968 – Civic Hall, Guildford, Surrey with Episode Six and Circus (Surrey Advertiser)

14 June 1968 – California Ballroom, Dunstable, Bedfordshire with supporting groups (website: www.california-ballroom.info/gigs/)

 

13 August 1968 – Torquay Town Hall, Torquay, Devon (Western Evening Herald)

 

2 September 1968 – Bluesology Festival, Chateau Impney, Droitwich, Worcestershire with  Fleetwood Mac, Chris Farlowe & The Thunderbirds, The Freddy Mack Show and Family (John Combe book)

21 September 1968 – Starlight Room, Boston Gliderdrome, Boston, Lincolnshire with Yes and Forever Changes (Lincolnshire Standard)

21 September 1968 – New Centre Hall, Manchester with The Impact (Manchester Evening News and Chronicle)

25 September 1968 – Tavistock Town Hall, Tavistock, Devon (Western Evening Mail)

28 September 1968 – Links International Club, Maxwell Park Youth Centre, Borehamwood, Herts with Chain Gang (Simon Gee research) Melody Maker says support is Strawberry Jam

 

11 October 1968 – Kew Boat House, Kew, London (Richmond & Twickenham Times)

11 October 1968 – Coronation Hall, Kingston upon Thames, London (Kingston and Malden Borough News)

26 October 1968 – Plymouth Guildhall, Plymouth, Devon with Frozen Tear (Western Evening Mail)

 

1 November 1968 – King’s College, Strand, London with Lemon Tree and Heart ‘N’ Souls (Melody Maker)

8 November 1968 – Rag Charities Ball, Hotel Metropole, Brighton, West Sussex with Spooky Tooth, Wynder K Frog, Honeybus and Chicken Shack

9 November 1968 – Marine Ballroom, Lyme Regis, Dorset (Dorset Evening Echo)

 

6 December 1968 – Borough Assembly Hall, Aylesbury, Bucks (website: http://aylesburymusictown.co.uk/)

1969

10 January 1969 – Sharberry Hall, Ilminster, Somerset (Fabulous 208)

25 January 1969 – Gala Ballroom, Norwich, Norfolk (Fabulous 208)

26 January 1969 – Roundhouse, Chalk Farm, London (Fabulous 208)

 

3 February 1969 – Silver Blades, Streatham, London (Mick Capewell’s Marmalade Skies)

20 February 1969 – Imperial College, Charity Concert, Royal Albert Hall, London with The Spencer Davis Group, Status Quo, East of Eden and The Nashville Teens (Melody Maker)

26 February 1969 – Fiesta Club, Stockton-on-Tees, County Durham (Fabulous 208)

28 February 1969 – Woolwich Polytechnic, Woolwich, London (Fabulous 208)

 

1 March 1969 – Corn Exchange, Cambridge (Fabulous 208)

Trevor Burton left around this time and Rick Price joined

19 March 1969 – Lyceum, London (Fabulous 208)

20 March 1969 – Town Hall, Reading, Berkshire (Fabulous 208)

22 March 1969 – Bradford University, Bradford, West Yorkshire (Fabulous 208)

23 March 1969 – Redcar Jazz Club, Redcar, North Yorkshire with Ruby James & The Sound Seekers (Dennis Weller, Chris Scott Wilson and Graham Lowe’s book)

 

24 May 1969 – Royal Links Pavilion, Cromer, Norfolk with Eyes of Blond and Uncle Rufls Band (Julie Fielder book: What Flo Said Next)

 

24 August 1969 – Hastings Pier, Hastings, East Sussex (Roger Bistow’s research at Dizzy Tiger Music website)

 

6 September 1969 – Starlight Room, Boston Gliderdrome, Boston, Lincolnshire with The Applejacks (Lincolnshire Standard)

 

20 December 1969 – California Ballroom, Dunstable, Bedfordshire with two supporting groups (website: www.california-ballroom.info/gigs/)

Copyright © Nick Warburton. All Rights Reserved. No part of this article may be reproduced or transmitted in any from or by any means, without prior permission from the author

Jimmy Cliff & the New Generation


Hamilton & The Hamilton Movement, clockwise from front: Ron Thomas, Mick Fletcher, Gary Hamilton, Tony Sinclair, Mel Wayne, Dave Mahoney and (sitting down) Phil WainmanAll except Gary Hamilton (and John Droy, not in photo) were in The New Generation (version 2) backing Jimmy Cliff.
Jamaican reggae singer Jimmy Cliff is best known to international audiences for the songs “Sitting in Limbo”, “You Can Get It If You Really Want” and “Many Rivers to Cross”, taken from the 1972 soundtrack album The Harder They Come. One of the first artists to introduce reggae to a wider audience, Cliff started performing in his native Jamaica during the early 1960s where he was spotted by Island Records founder Chris Blackwell, who brought him to England in October/November 1965.Over the next four years, Cliff worked the UK club scene with a series of backing groups – The New Generation, The Sound System, Dave Anthony’s Moods, The Soul System (aka The Attack), The Shakedown Sound (December 1966-February 1968) and The Wynder K Frog Band, playing a mixture of soul and R&B.Jimmy Cliff & The New Generation (November 1965-February 1966)

Jimmy Cliff – lead vocals
Dave Pegg – lead guitar
Graham Gallery – bass
Dave Brown – organ
Frank Devine – drums
Ayshea Brough – vocals
Pete Hodge(s) – vocals

Cliff’s first band, The New Generation, was a Birmingham group known as Roy Everett’s Blueshounds, whose most notable member was future Fairport Convention bass player Dave Pegg. The Blueshounds were good mates of The Spencer Davis Group, who put in a good word for the band when Chris Blackwell was looking for musicians to support Cliff on the road. In November 1965, Blackwell released The Spencer Davis Group’s “Keep on Running”, the band’s first number one single.

Around the same time, Blackwell signed The Blueshounds to the agency he co-ran, West End Promotions Ltd, which also represented The Steampacket, Hedgehoppers Anonymous, The Alex Harvey Go Soul Show, Millie Small, Ayshea Brough and the newly arrived Jimmy Cliff. With Pete Hodge(s) taking over from Roy Everett, The Blueshounds attended an “audition” recording session at Cecil Sharpe House in London on 23 November 1965 with promoter George Webb (The Spencer Davis Group’s agent) and DJ Alan Freeman. Also in attendance that day were Jimmy Cliff and Ayshea Brough, a young singer that George Webb was trying to launch on the scene, who’d been working with future Hedgehoppers Anonymous drummer Glenn Martin.

Passing the audition, The Blueshounds were renamed The New Generation and Cliff travelled up to Birmingham to stay with Dave Pegg’s family for about two weeks while rehearsals took place to ready the band for the road. Singers Ayshea Brough and Pete Hodge(s) were also added to the touring band and had their own vocal spots in the show.

The (incomplete) gig listing below, which is taken from Dave Pegg’s scrap book, shows that the band’s debut took place at the Ritz Ballroom in King’s Heath, West Midlands in mid-December. For most of these gigs, the band was billed as The New Generation, although the Marquee gigs list them as The Jimmy Cliff Big Sound. The only exception is a show at the Cue Club in Paddington, West London on 28 January where the band was billed as The Sound System, which may originally have been assigned for Cliff’s second support group (see below), although Dave Pegg’s version did honour this gig.

Notable gigs:

15 December 1965 – The Ritz Ballroom, King’s Heath, West Midlands
17 December 1965 – The Carlton Ballroom, Erdington, West Midlands with Steampacket and Graham Bond
17 December 1965 – Birmingham Town Hall, Birmingham with Steampacket and Graham Bond
23 December 1965 – Marquee, London with Steampacket (billed as Jimmy Cliff Big Sound)
27 January 1966 – Marquee, London with The Steampacket
28 January 1966 – The Cue Club, Paddington (billed as Jimmy Cliff, Owen Gray, Ayshea and The Sound System)
29 January 1966 – The Ricky Tick, Windsor, Berkshire
4 February 1966 – Bluesville R&B Club, Manor House, Finsbury Park (billed as Jimmy Cliff & The New Generation featuring Ayesha and Pete Hodge)
5 February 1966 – Chelsea College, London with The Spencer Davis Group

It’s not entirely clear why Jimmy Cliff & The New Generation went their separate ways in early February 1966. Dave Pegg’s diary shows that a gig planned for 6 February was cancelled and on 13 February he was back in Birmingham working with a new band – The Uglys.

The decision to find a second band to back Cliff on the road was probably made in mid-late January and Chris Blackwell already knew who he wanted for the job.

Jimmy Cliff & The Sound System/New Generation (February-July 1966)

Jimmy Cliff – lead vocals
Tony Sinclair – lead guitar
Ron Thomas – bass
Mick Fletcher – organ
John Droy – trumpet
Mel Wayne – sax
Dave Mahoney – sax
Pete Hodges – vocals
Ayshea Brough – vocals
Phil Wainman – drums

The next group to back Jimmy Cliff on the road was also, somewhat confusingly, initially billed as The New Generation, although they also used the name The Sound System. Promoters added to the confusion by sometimes billing the band as The Jimmy Cliff Big Sound and The Jimmy Cliff Sound.

The Sound System, as they became around early January, had originally been called The Phil Wainman Band/Set. Phil Wainman, who years later found fame as a noted producer among other things, had first started out as a drummer in the early 1960s, working with The Hi Grades in Sweden and The Paramounts before linking up with the remnants of West London band, The All-Nite Workers around October 1965.

Ron Thomas, Mel Wayne and Dave Mahoney had all been members of this group, which had morphed out of Mike Dee & The Prophets in early-mid 1965. Mick Fletcher joined when it became The Phil Wainman Band/Set around October 1965 after playing in The Herd while Tony Sinclair and John Droy came in soon after, the former from Johnny Halliday’s band in France.

According to David Katz’s excellent book, “Jimmy Cliff – An Unauthorised Biography”, The Phil Wainman Band/Set secured a residency at Dolly’s Club in Jermyn Street in central London around November of that year. One night Chris Blackwell dropped in and introduced himself. After be-friending Wainman, he kept the musicians in mind as a support band for the Jamaican acts on Island Records’ roster, including Jackie Edwards, Millie Small and Owen Gray. Changing name to The Sound System, Wainman’s band started rehearsing with these acts in late January and one early gig, backing Owen Gray, took place at the New All Star Club in Artillery Passage near Liverpool Street station, London on 5 February 1966.

Around this time, it became clear that Cliff and the original New Generation would be separating so Wainman’s band started rehearsing with the singer when he wasn’t gigging with Dave Pegg’s group. After a few weeks’ rehearsals, Jimmy Cliff & The Sound System/New Generation debuted at the Marquee on 10 February, billed as The Jimmy Cliff Big Sound.

Over the next four and half months, Wainman’s band backed Cliff on the road, which included a package tour with The Who and The Spencer Davis Group in April 1966. It was during this time that Keith Moon spotted Wainman’s Red Sparkle Premier drum kit with two bass drums and decided to switch to the same set up two months later.

According to Wainman, Jimmy Cliff & The Sound System/New Generation were particularly popular in Grimsby and played there at least once a month. They also played four nights at the Penthouse. However, shortly after the California Ballroom gig in Dunstable on 1 July, Jimmy Cliff and The Sound System/New Generation went their separate ways.

It’s not clear who backed Jimmy Cliff for a series of gigs that took place at London’s Whisky A Go Go on 9, 16 and 23 August as no support band is listed in Melody Maker, but he was joined by Dave Anthony’s Moods and The Soul System (aka The Attack) at some point during this period. In December 1966, Jimmy Cliff hooked up with his next group, The Shakedown Sound with whom he worked with until February 1968. He then joined forces with Wynder K Frog.

As for The Sound System, the musicians joined forces with singer Gary Hamilton who was putting together a new version of Hamilton & The Movement (see future entry).

Notable gigs:

10 February 1966 – Marquee with Steampacket (billed as Jimmy Cliff Big Sound)
13 February 1966 – Nottingham Boat Club, Nottingham (billed as Jimmy Cliff & The New Generation)
19 February 1966 – Klooks Kleek, London (billed as Jimmy Cliff & The New Generation, with Ayshea and Pete Hodge)
24 February 1966 – Marquee with Steampacket (billed as Jimmy Cliff Big Sound)
8 March 1966 – Marquee with Spencer Davis Group (billed as Jimmy Cliff & The New Generation)
26 March 1966 – Klooks Kleek, London (billed as Jimmy Ciff & The New Generation and Pete Hodge)
14-30 April 1966 – Package tour with The Who, Spencer Davis Group, Paul Dean & The Soul Savages and others
1 May 1966 – Twisted Wheel, Manchester (billed as Jimmy Cliff & The Sound System)
10 May 1966 – Marquee with Spencer Davis Group (billed as Jimmy Cliff Sound)
14 June 1966 – Marquee with Spencer Davis Group (billed as Jimmy Cliff Sound)
1 July 1966 – California Ballroom, Dunstable (billed as Jimmy Cliff & The Sound System) with Him & The Others

Copyright © Nick Warburton, 2012. All Rights Reserved. No part of this article may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, without prior permission from the author.

To contact the author, email: Warchive@aol.com

I’d like to thank the following for their help in piecing this story together: Dave Pegg, David Katz, Laurie Hornsby, Andy Neill, Ron Thomas, Phil Wainman, Mel Wayne and Brian Hosking.

Most of the live gigs above are taken from Melody Maker’s listing. The California Ballroom, Dunstable website also proved useful as did the Nottingham Evening Post. Thanks also to the Manchester Soul site for the Twisted Wheel gig.

 

The Moody Blues

Denny Laine (guitar, vocals)
Michael Pinder (keyboards, vocals)
Ray Thomas (harmonica, saxophone, flute, vocals)
Clint Warwick (bass, vocals)
Graeme Edge (drums)

1964

April The nucleus of the band is formed by Laine (b. Brian Frederick Hines, 29 October 1944, Tyseley, Birmingham, W. Midlands, UK), who has just disbanded his group Denny And The Diplomats, with Thomas (b. 29 December 1942, Stourport-on-Severn, Hereford & Worcs, UK.) and Pinder (b. 27 December 1941, Birmingham, W. Midlands, UK), who have both been playing in local outfits El Riot & The Rebels and The Krewcats, and have just returned from a year’s residence at Hamburg’s Top Ten club.
May (4) Rehearsals begin with the addition of drummer Edge (b. 30 March 1942, Rochester, Staffs, UK), who has previously been a member of Gerry Levene & The Avengers and bass player Clint Warwick (b. Albert Eccles, 25 June 1940, Birmingham, W. Midlands, UK), formerly a member of The Rainbows. The group quickly gains a residency at the Carlton Ballroom in Erdington, West Midlands, initially billed as The M&B Five, apparently in the hope of gaining sponsorship from local brewers Mitchell and Butler. Laine, who has pushed the band’s sound towards the blues and jazz of London based groups, decides soon afterwards to re-name the band after a Slim Harpo song titled “Moody Blue” and The M&B Five becomes The Moody Blues Five.
August The band attracts the attention of London manager Tony Secunda, who secures The Moody Blues (as they now call themselves), a residency at London’s Marquee club on Monday nights, where they replace Manfred Mann. Through their prestigious “live” work at the club, the band quickly attracts the attention of Decca Records which signs the group. Shortly afterwards The Moody Blues record their debut single, the Pinder-Laine composition “Lose Your Money” which the band performs on ITV’s Ready Steady Go!.
September (3) The group plays its first show at the Marquee in London.
(11) The Moody Blues appear at Birmingham’s Town Hall alongside The Spencer Davis Group and headliners Alexis Korner Incorporated.
October (4) The band plays at the Marquee in London.
(30) The Moody Blues appear at the Crawdaddy club in Richmond, Surrey.
November After “Lose Your Money” fails to chart, the group records a cover of Bessie Banks’s US R&B hit, “Go Now”, which has been given to the band by New York disc-jockey B. Mitchell Reed during a visit to the UK.
December (7) The group appears at the Marquee in London.

1965

January (8) The group begins a 24-date, twice-nightly tour with Chuck Berry at the Odeon Theatre, London, which will end 31 January at the Regal Theatre, Edmonton, London.
(28) “Go Now”, produced by Denny Cordell Alex Murray, tops the UK chart.
February The band quickly releases “I Don’t Want To Go On Without You”, a revival of a Drifters’ b-side as a follow up single, but it only reaches UK #33. Part of the single’s failure can be attributed to the simultaneous release of identical covers by The Searchers and The Escorts. (The group is unhappy with the recording because Thomas’s flute solo has been inexplicably erased from the final pressing.)
March (8) The Moody Blues make their first live broadcast on BBC Radio’s Joe Loss Pop Show.
April “Go Now” holds down anchor position in a unique US Top 10 in which 9 of the singles are from the UK.
(11) The group takes part in the annual New Musical Express poll winners concert at the Empire Pool, London, with The Beatles, The Rolling Stones, The Kinks and The Animals among others.
May The band releases an EP, which features both sides of the group’s debut single plus the a-sides of the previous two releases.
(24) The Moody Blues take part in the British Song Festival at the Dome, Brighton, East Sussex.
June (5) The band guests on ITV’s Thank Your Lucky Stars, where it introduces its new single, the Pinder-Laine collaboration “From The Bottom Of My Heart”.
(15) The Moody Blues join The Rolling Stones for a 4-date tour of Scotland alongside The Hollies, The Cannon Brothers and The Checkmates. The tour begins at the Odean Theatre, Glasgow.
(16) The group performs at the Usher Hall, Edinburgh.
(17) The Moody Blues appear at the Caird Hall, Dundee.
(18) The final date takes place at the Capitol Theatre, Aberdeen. (While the Stones prepare for a short tour of Scandinavia, The Moody Blues return to London in order to fly to New York for their debut US appearance.)
(19) The group makes its US debut with The Kinks at the Academy of Music in New York.
July “From The Bottom Of My Heart” is released and climbs to UK #22 and US #93. The Moody Blues’ debut album Magnificent Moodies, which has been produced by Denny Cordell is released to coincide with the single but fails to chart. In the US the album is released as Go Now and features a different track listing.
(24) The band performs at the Birdcage in Portsmouth, Hants.
August (1) The Moody Blues perform at the London Palladium with The Rolling Stones, The Fourmost, Steampacket and others.
(6) The group plays on the opening day of the fifth annual National Jazz & Blues Festival at the Richmond Athletic Ground, Richmond, Surrey.
September (6) The band signs a management contract with NEMS.
(21) The Moody Blues participate in Pop From Britain concert at the Royal Albert Hall, London, with Cliff Bennett & The Rebel Rousers, Georgie Fame & The Blue Flames and The Fourmost.
(25) The group appears at the Birdcage in Portsmouth, Hants with St Louis Checks.
(30) The Moody Blues replace Unit 4 Plus 2 for 3 dates on The Rolling Stones UK tour. The first date takes place at the Gaumont Theatre, Hanley, Staffs. Also on the tour are The Spencer Davis Group, The End and The Habits.
October (1) The band appears at the ABC Theatre, Chester, Cheshire.
(2) The group’s final appearance takes place at the ABC Theatre, Wigan, Lancashire. Unit 4 Plus 2 return to the tour immediately afterwards.
November The Laine-Pinder composition “Everyday” only reaches UK #44, despite becoming a turntable hit on pirate radio.
December (3) The group supports The Beatles on their final UK tour, a 9-date twice-nightly package, which opens at Glasgow’s Odeon cinema and ends on December 12 at the Capitol Cinema, Cardiff, Wales.
(19) The Moody Blues appear on CBS TV’s Ed Sullivan Show.

1966

March (8) The group appears at the Montreux Golden Rose TV festival.
April Another Laine-Pinder track “Stop!” is lifted from the UK album and released as a US single, where it spends a week on the Hot 100 at #98. (The song incidentally, is later covered by singer Julie Grant but is not a success). Secunda leaves at this point to work with The Move and is replaced by The Beatles’ manager Brian Epstein. However, he fails to lift the group’s flagging career and as a result The Moody Blues are forced to “drastically reduce their engagement fees.”
(2) The Moody Blues appear at the Club Continental, Eastbourne, East Sussex.
May (1) The band performs at the Oasis in Manchester.
(30) The group plays at the Pavilion in Bath, Avon.
June (4) Melody Maker announces that the group has undertaken a short tour of Belgium, including a TV appearance from the Casino at Knokke. The magazine also reports that the band is due to appear at the Paris Olympia on 12 June.
(15) The Moody Blues perform at the Bromel club, the Bromley Court Hotel, Kent.
(21) The band appears at a commerative ball at Oxford University.
(24) The group plays at London’s Ram Jam club. Warwick, who is disillusioned by the band’s drop in fortunes, leaves the group and quits the music business. After Klaus Voorman decides not to join, Rod Clark, a bass player from Great Yarmouth, who has played with Les Garcons and The Southerners takes Warwick’s place, although Pinder and Thomas’s former El Riot & The Rebels cohort John Lodge (b. 20 July 1943, Birmingham, W. Midlands, UK) is rumoured to have been offered the original slot.
July (9) Pinder and Laine’s “This Is My House (But Nobody Calls)” (the intended b-side of the band’s forthcoming UK single) is issued in the US hitting #119.
(14) The new line up performs at the Villa Marina in Coventry, W. Midlands.
(30) The group appears at the Riverside Dance Club in Douglas, the Isle of Man.
August (6) The Moody Blues begin a 9-day tour of Denmark.
September (3) Returning to the UK, the band appears at the Black Prince in Tenbury Wells.
(10) Melody Maker reports that The Moody Blues fly to Holland for a TV show and then the next day perform in Brussels.
(15) The band plays at the Jaarbeurs in Utrecht, Holland.
(16) The Moody Blues perform at Midnight City in Birmingham with Cliff Bennett & The Rebel Rousers.
(23) The group appears at Cardiff Capitol Theatre on a bill that includes Cliff Bennett & The Rebel Rousers, The Scaffold and The Fourmost.
(28) The Moody Blues appear at the Flamingo in London in what is probably Denny Laine’s final show.
October Rod Clark leaves to join The Rockin’ Berries and John Lodge joins. Lodge, who has remained in higher education since the band’s split in February 1963, has subsequently played in local bands The Carpetbaggers and The John Bull Breed. Laine, meanwhile, anticipating Brian Wilson’s role in The Beach Boys decides to concentrate on writing and studio work.
(8) Record Mirror reports that Laine has officially left The Moody Blues. He will quickly emerge with an amplified backing group The Electric String Band – a predecessor and major influence on The Electric Light Orchestra.
(12) Decca releases the group’s first single in over a year, the French-flavoured “Boulevard De La Madelaine”, written by Pinder and Laine but it isn’t a hit. On the same day, Melody Maker reports that the band appears at the Flamingo in London. To fill Laine’s position in the band, the group turns to Justin Hayward (b. David Justin Hayward, 14 October 1946, Swindon, Wilts, UK), who has played in a number of Swindon bands – The Riversiders, The Rebels, The Whispers, The Shots and All Things Bright before joining Marty Wilde’s Wildcats for two days. He then joins Marty Wilde and his wife in The Marty Wilde Three, who record the singles “Since You’ve Gone” and “I Cried” for Decca Records and on 8 April 1966 plays alongside Wilde at a charity show at the London Palladium. Hayward leaves to sign a solo deal with Pye A&R chief Alan Freeman and manager Lonnie Donegan. This results in a one-off single “London Is Behind Me”, before Hayward signs to Parlophone, which releases a second single “I Can’t Face The World Without You”. When both singles fail, Hayward writes to Eric Burdon to inquire about a position in his New Animals. Burdon, with his band already signed-up, passes Hayward’s name onto Mike Pinder. The Moody Blues move to Belgium in November to perform some gigs and to avoid the UK taxman. The band continues to perform its old R&B repertoire despite Laine’s departure and the recent changes in the UK “music scene”.
December The group performs in France, where it’s still very popular.

1967

January (14) Decca releases another Pinder-Laine collaboration “Life’s Not Life”, which is withdrawn shortly afterwards.
February (18) The group appears at the Plaza Ballroom in Birmingham with the Traction and The Attack.
March (7) The Moody Blues play at Birmingham’s Ringway Club.
(20) The band appears at the Broadway Club, Dudley Zoo.
(22) The Moody Blues play at Middle Earth in London.
(27) The band plays two shows in the West Midlands. The first is at the Mackadown, Kitts Green with The Monopoly. The second is at the Belfry, Wishaw with The Gods and Exception.
(30) The group drops the old repertoire (and suits) in favour of a new musical style. The band records Hayward’s “Fly Me High” and Pinder’s “Really Haven’t Got The Time” with new producer Tony Clarke as a prospective single.
April The band signs up (along with The Supremes and Ray Charles) to promote Coca-Cola in the teen market. The company’s $10 million campaign requires each artist to record a radio jingle in their own style but featuring the slogan Things Go Better With Coke. The band embarks on a gruelling tour of the Northern club circuit, including a spot at Newcastle’s Cavendish club.
(14) Denny Laine releases his debut single with The Electric String Band “Say You Don’t Mind” which fails to chart; although ex-Zombies singer Colin Blunstone will later score a top 20 hit with it in 1972.
May (5) The Moody Blues release their first single with the new line-up, “Fly Me High” which is not a success despite being a popular radio hit. The band embarks on a brief tour of Scandinavia.
(19) The band shares a double bill with former group leader Denny Laine at London club, Tiles.
(27) Plans are unveiled for the group to appear on a US colour TV special as “Fly Me High” is given an American release.
June (10) They play the Fete and Donkey Derby in Sutton Coldfield, West Midlands with The Ugly’s and The Bobcats.
(12) The Moody Blues appear at Christ College, Cambridge with The Who and The Herd.
(22) The band appears at Middle Earth with Pink Floyd.
(29) The group records Hayward’s “Leave This Man Alone”.
July (9) The band plays at the Roundhouse with Pink Floyd and The Outer Limits.
(17) The Moody Blues record Pinder’s ambitious “Love & Beauty”, which is the first track to feature the band’s characteristic symphonic sound, created with the use of the mellotron. Shortly afterwards the band introduces its new style at the Glastonbury Festival and is an immediate success.
(29) The group performs at the London club, the Upper Cut with The Maze.
August The Moody Blues embark on a “summer” tour of France. The group appears at the Midem Music Festival in Cannes performing most of the songs that will subsequently appear on its forthcoming album.
September (7) The group opens for The Pink Floyd at the Roundhouse, Chalk Farm, London.
(22) The Moody Blues release Pinder’s “Love & Beauty” as a single, but it isn’t a hit.
October (8) Signed to Decca’s new progressive label, Deram, the band begins work on its first album in over two years, recording Hayward’s epic “Nights In White Satin”. The group were originally invited to record a stereo version of Dvorak’s New World Symphony with classical backing from The London Festival Orchestra, conducted by Peter Knight, but is allowed to record its stage show, loosely based around a day in the life of a fictional character, instead.

1968

January Extracted from the album, Hayward’s “Nights In White Satin” climbs to UK #19 as parent album reaches #27.
(12) Laine meanwhile, disbands The Electric String Band after his second solo single “Too Much In Love” and moves to Spain to study flamenco guitar.
(19) The Moody Blues play at the Punch Bowl, Lapworth, West Midlands.
(20) The group travels to France to appear at the Midem Music Festival in Cannes, later that week.
February (3) The Moody Blues begin a UK tour at the Nelson Imperial, Lancashire. The tour will conclude at Reading University on March 15.
(10) In the US “Nights In White Satin” only reaches #103.
March (13) The group appears at Birmingham Town Hall with The Spencer Davis Group, Manfred Mann, Don Partridge and Piccadilly Line.
(22) The Moody Blues perform at Middle Earth, Covent Garden, London.
May (4) Days Of Future Past enters the US chart at #3 and earns the group its first gold disk, during a chart run of 102 weeks.
June Hayward’s “Voices In The Sky” is lifted from the band’s forthcoming album and reaches UK #27.
(29) The Moody Blues make a rare concert appearance at London’s Queen Elizabeth Hall.
August The group’s third album, In Search Of The Lost Chord, another concept album, climbs to UK #5. (The band is performing in the former Czechoslovakia at the time and when the Russian army moves in are quickly asked to leave the country by the British Consulate.)
September Hayward’s “Tuesday Afternoon” is taken from Days Of Future Past and belatedly released as a US single, where it hits #24. In Search Of A Lost Chord, rises to US #23 and earns a second gold disk.
October (11) The group records non-album track “A Simple Game”, written by Mike Pinder.
(21-24) The band is supported by Chicago at the Fillmore West, San Francisco.
(25-26) The group flies to New York City to appear at the Fillmore East with John Mayall’s Bluesbreakers and Rhinoceros.
November (1) Having supported Cream during their final US tour, the group appears at Madison Square Gardens, New York, for Cream’s final US date. “Ride My See Saw”, written by Lodge, is extracted from the new album and makes US #61.
December “Ride My See Saw” hits UK #42. The single’s b-side “A Simple Game” is later a UK #3 for The Four Tops with Clarke producing. (The Four Tops will also cover another Mike Pinder song, “So Deep Within You” from The Moody Blues’ next album). The band performs its last US dates in Vancouver, Canada.

1969

March (11) The group appears at the Grand Gala Du Disque, Amsterdam, Holland on a bill including Gladys Knight & The Pips.
April Hayward’s “Never Comes The Day” is released as a single but fails to chart.
May On The Threshold Of A Dream tops the UK chart for 2 weeks and climbs to US #20 during a 136-week chart run, the Moody Blues’ third gold disk.
July “Never Comes The Day” reaches US #91. Denny Laine meanwhile returns from Spain and joins ex-Move member Trevor Burton in Balls.
August (30) The Moody Blues play on the opening day of the Isle Of Wight Festival.
October Hayward and Thomas’s “Watching And Waiting” is the first single to be released on the group’s own Threshold label.
December The Moody Blues’ new album To Our Children’s Children’s Children hits UK #2 as the band moves to Cobham, Surrey to open the first Threshold record store.
(12) The band performs at the Royal Albert Hall, London, during a UK tour. The concert is recorded (and released as part of Caught Live Plus 5 in June 1977).

1970

January The group’s new album is released in the US and makes #14 becoming the band’s fourth gold disk
March (20-21) The band is supported by Argent and Lee Michaels at New York’s Fillmore East.
April (2/11)The Moody Blues are supported by Richie Havens at the Berkeley Community Theatre, California.
May Hayward’s dramatic “Question” hits UK #2, held from the top by the England World Cup Squad’s “Back Home”. Laine, who has recently joined Ginger Baker’s Airforce sings lead vocal on their cover of Bob Dylan’s “Man Of Constant Sorrow” which hits US #85 on 30 May.
June “Question” reaches US #21.
August The Moody Blues’ new album A Question Of Balance, written and recorded in 5 weeks, hits UK #1 for 3 weeks.
(30) The group plays on the final day of the second Isle Of Wight Festival.
September A Question Of Balance makes US #3 and earns the band its fifth gold disk.
October (30) The band performs at London’s Royal Festival Hall.
December (3) The Moody Blues embark on a US tour making their Carnegie Hall, New York debut on 14 December.

1971

August Laine joins Paul McCartney’s Wings.

1974

February After two further albums, Every Good Boy Deserves Favour (1971) and Seventh Sojourn (1972), which both earn a gold disk, and a 9-month world tour, The Moody Blues decide to split for the time being to concentrate on solo projects. (Hayward’s solo career will be the most enduring and successful).

1978

June The band re-unites for a new album, Octave which hits UK #6 and US #13, and becomes the Moody Blues’ first platinum disk. However, during the recording of the album, producer Tony Clarke leaves followed soon afterwards by Mike Pinder; both have been closely identified with the development of the band’s symphonic sound. Pinder is replaced by ex-Refugee member Patrick Moraz, who remains with The Moody Blues into the 1980s, and helps them to become one of the top selling bands of the decade. Pinder meanwhile, remains in the US and emerges in 1995 with second solo effort Among The Stars.

Sources:

Portsmouth’s Birdcage dates by Dave Allen.

Machine, August 1965, by Johnny Black, Mojo Magazine, August 1995.
Call Up The Groups – The Golden Age Of British Beat (1962-1967), by Alan Clayson, Blandford Press, 1985.
Denny Laine, by Alan Clayson, Record Collector, #191, July 1995.
Time Machine, October 1966, by Fred Dellar, Mojo Magazine October 1996.
Collectable 45s of the Swinging ‘60s, by Pete Dickerson and Mike Gordon, The Vintage Record Centre, 1984.
Art Of Rock – Posters From Presley To Punk, by Paul D Grushkin, Artabras, Cross River Press Ltd, 1987.
The Castle – Love #2, by David Peter Housden, 1993.
The Castle – Love #9, by David Peter Housden, 1995.
The Moody Blues UK Singles & UK Albums, by Tim Joseph, Record Collector, #81 & 82, April & May 1986.
Karnbach, James and Bernson, Carol. The Complete Recording Guide To The Rolling Stones. Aurum Press, 1997, pages 111, 112 and 115.
Pink Floyd In The Flesh book, page 43.
The Moody Blues, by John Reed, Record Collector, November 1996, #207, pages 64-71.
Book Of Rock Stars, 2nd Edition, by Dafydd Rees and Luke Crampton, Guinness Publishing Ltd, 1991.
Sleeve notes to album This Is The Moody Blues, by John Tracy, 1989.
Joel Whitburn’s Bubbling Under Hot 100 1959-1985, by Joel Whitburn, Billboard Record Research Inc, 1985.
Joel Whitburn’s Pop Annual 1955-1994, by Joel Whitburn, Billboard Record Research Inc, 1995.
Birmingham Evening Mail 1967-1968.
Disc, May 27, 1967, page 4.
Melody Maker, March 5, 1966, pages 5; April 2, 1966, page 13; June 4, 1966, page 5; June 11, 1966, page 13; June 25, 1966, page 13; May 20, 1967, page 5; July 29, 1967, page 12; January 6, 1968, page 3 and March 23, 1968, page 14.
NME, week ending January 20, 1968.

Thanks to Tony Brown for corrections.

Copyright © Nick Warburton, 2009 All Rights Reserved. No part of this article may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, without prior permission from the author.

Email: Warchive@aol.com

Visit: www.nickwarburton.com

Denny Laine’s Electric String Band


Denny Laine with the Moody Blues
Denny Laine (lead guitar, vocals)
Binky McKenzie (bass)
Wilhelm Martin (violin)
John Stein (violin)
Clive Gillinson (cello)
Chris Van Campen (cello)
Viv Prince (drums)

1966

October (8) After recording the single Life’s Not Life, Laine (b. Brian Frederick Hines, 29 October 1944, Tyseley, Birmingham, England) leaves The Moody Blues to pursue a new musical project. He briefly forms a trio but the project fails to gel as the others don’t share his new musical ideas.

December Laine forms an amplified string quartet with classical musicians Gillinson, Martin, Stein and Van Campen (who are all ex-Royal Academy), and a backing band featuring ex-Pretty Things and Bunch Of Fives drummer Prince (b. 9 August 1944, Loughborough, Leicestershire, England) and bass player Binky McKenzie, who has worked with future Crazy World of Arthur Brown keyboard player Vincent Crane and blues legend, Alexis Korner.

Denny Laine early 1967

1967

January (21) Melody Maker announces that Laine is recording for Decca’s new ‘progressive’ label Deram. Laine will continue to work under the guidance of producer Denny Cordell, who oversaw The Moody Blues’ recordings.

April (14) His debut single Say You Don’t Mind is released but fails to chart despite being aired on John Peel’s popular independent radio show Top Gear. The song’s advanced nature is confirmed when ex-Zombies lead vocalist Colin Blunstone takes a similar version to UK #15 in 1972. Disc magazine states that Laine has been commissioned to write an Italian film score and is expected in Milan in July for 10 days to supervise the recording. The project, however, is later shelved.
(29) Laine is a compere at the 14-hour Technicolour Dream concert at London’s Alexandra Palace.


Dutch sleeve with b-side title missing the definite article.May (3) Denny Laine’s Electric String Band supported by Robert Plant’s Band of Joy at Cedar Club, Birmingham.
(7) The group’s debut performance at London’s Saville Theatre (which was originally scheduled for 3 May) is cancelled when Laine pulls out one hour before the show. According to Melody Maker, bass player Binky McKenzie leaves three days before the show and Laine is unable to get a replacement fully rehearsed in time. Shortly afterwards, Laine reorganises the group, bringing in new bass player Cliff Barton, and Angus Anderson (violin) and Haflidi Halynisson (cello), who replace Martin and Van Campen.
(10) Denny Laine’s Electric String Band return to the Cedar Club for another show supported by Robert Plant’s Band of Joy
(19) His new group makes its debut at London’s Tiles Club on a double bill with his former band, The Moody Blues. (Disc magazine announces that Laine is due to do a six-day promo tour of the US from 24-30 May, but it is subsequently cancelled.)
(26) Say You Don’t Mind is given an American release.

June (4) The band finally plays at London’s Saville Theatre alongside Procol Harum, The Jimi Hendrix Experience and others. (According to Melody Maker, the group performs in Paris on 7-8 June and then travels to Brussels for three days of concerts and TV performances. However, this seems unlikely as a later issue claims that the group begins work on a new single and a debut album on 7 June.)
(8) The group plays at the Marquee with The Pyramid (featuring future Fairport Convention singer Ian Matthews and several soon-to-be Denny Laine collaborators).
(10) June Laine’s band is booked to play at the Birdcage in Portsmouth, Hants but doesn’t show up.
(19) Denny Laine’s Electric String Band makes its debut BBC radio appearance on the Light Programme.
(24) Denny Laine’s Electric String Band appear at the Swan, Yardley with The Maddening Crowd

July Laine cuts the ambitious track Why Did You Come? with new bass player Andy Leigh, which producer Denny Cordell subsequently holds back because he feels that it is “too subtle”. (A Melody Maker article from this time, however, claims that the master tape goes missing.) Leigh has previously worked with Denny Cordell’s “Studio G” project, which has recorded two tracks for a promotional EP circulated in tiny quantities to British television and film production companies. The project also features organist/pianist Mike Lease who is brought in by Cordell to arrange strings for one of Laine’s tracks and drummer Peter Trout, who joins the Electric String Band later in the year.
(13) The new line up with Leigh performs at Blaisers, Kensington.
(14) Denny Laine’s Electric String Band make an appearance at London’s UFO club, where they perform Say You Don’t Mind, Ask The People, Why Did You Come?, Catherine’s Wheel and The Machine Song, which is never released.
(29) Laine’s group finally appears at the Birdcage in Portsmouth, Hants.

August (13) The band plays at the Windsor Blues and Jazz Festival, held at Windsor racecourse alongside Cream, Pentangle, Blossom Toes, Jeff Beck and many others.
(26) Laine arrives at his manager Brian Epstein’s Belgravia home hoping to arrange further work; little does he know that Epstein is dead inside from a drug overdose.
(26-28) The group takes part in a three-day rock festival held at Woburn Abbey with Eric Burdon & The Animals, The Jeff Beck Group, The Small Faces and others.
(27) Denny Laine’s Electric String Band appears at Saville Theatre with The Jimi Hendrix Experience, Tomorrow, Georgie Fame, Eric Burdon & The Animals, The Crazy World of Arthur Brown, Dantalion’s Chariot and others.

Denny Laine, summer 1967, Fabulous 208

September (8) Denny Laine’s Electric String Band perform at the Marquee with The Gods.
(9) The band performs at the UFO at the Roundhouse, London alongside The Soft Machine, The Pink Floyd, Tomorrow and The Move.
(23) Laine’s group appear at the Middle Earth club, King Street, Covent Garden alongside T-Rex and Picadilly Line. Shortly afterwards, Viv Prince departs and forms the short-lived VAMP. Laine recruits new drummer Peter Trout, who has previously worked with Andy Leigh in the “Studio G” band and appeared on sessions for Pyramid’s single Summer of Last Year. The new line up rehearses but the string quartet (with the exception of John Stein) leaves for a tour of Russia. Laine adds new cello player Nigel Pinkett alongside Leigh, Proud and Stein.

October (4) Laine’s band records its debut John Peel radio session, recording Say You Don’t Mind, Why Did You Come?, Catherine’s Wheel, Ask The People, a cover of Tim Hardin’s Reason To Believe and recent composition, . The session is broadcast on 8 October. Peter Trout leaves and reunites with Denny Laine in 1971.
(6) The band, with a new drummer, performs at the UFO, the Roundhouse, London with Tim Rose.
(15) Denny Laine’s Electric String Band return to the Middle Earth.

November Melody Maker announces that a Denny Laine album, containing three Laine compositions and a new single are scheduled for a Christmas release. (The former is subsequently cancelled.)
(17) Denny Laine’s Electric String Band appears at Nottingham Technical College, Nottingham with Deuce Coup.
(18) The group performs at the Middle Earth with Alexis Korner and Pegasus.

December (6) The band joins Fleetwood Mac and Warren Davies for a show at the Royal Hotel, Woburn Place, London.
(16) Laine’s band plays at the Britannia Boat Club, Nottingham.

1968

January (12) Laine releases his second single, the equally adventurous Too Much In Love which also fails to chart. (Melody Maker states that an album featuring nine Laine compositions is scheduled for release in early February and that a 10-day tour of Sweden commencing on 25 January is imminent. However, neither transpires).
(24) Denny Laine’s Electric String Band make a second Peel session appearance, recording Catherine’s Wheel, The Machine Song, Too Much In Love, and two new songs, Masks and the folk standard, Sally Free and Easy. The session is broadcast on 28 January.

February Laine disbands the group and concentrates on solo work on London’s folk circuit. After a few months, he moves to Spain and lives a gypsy lifestyle. Leigh briefly joins Spooky Tooth (appearing on their Ceremony album), before releasing a solo album on Polydor in early 1970. He will then become an integral part of Ian Matthews’s Southern Comfort.

May Moving to Spain, Laine stops first in the Canary Islands where he meets American draft dodger, Charlie Jackson, a flute player who has come to Spain to learn flamenco guitar. The pair become friends and busk for six months before moving to Moron de La Frontera, a small town near Seville. While there, Laine learns flamenco guitar phrases from players from all over the world and is influenced by local star, Diego del Eastor.

October Returning to Britain, Laine jams with the ad-hoc outfit Balls, which features John Lennon and Rolling Stone Brian Jones. The band reportedly records a song titled Go To The Mountains for Apple but it is never released. Around this time, he reunites with Mike Lease, who is working with John Martyn’s wife, singer/songwriter, Beverly Kutner. Lease agrees to help Laine audition bass players and drummers for a new version of Balls but despite finding suitable musicians, including drummer Peter Phillips, the line up never settles.

1969

February Laine participates in an early Blind Faith session. He is, however, in the process of forming a new line-up of Balls with Trevor Burton of The Move and decides not to join the outfit. He will later join Ginger Baker in Airforce in the spring of the following year on an ad-hoc basis.

1970

August (5-6) Having contributed to Ginger Baker’s Airforce album and spent the last 18 months rehearsing material with Trevor Burton and ex-Plastic Ono drummer Alan White at a country house in Cholesbury, Bucks, Balls are scheduled to make their live debut at the ‘Popanalia’ festival in Nice, France. The group misses the concert, although their lone single, Burton’s Fight For My Country backed by Laine and White’s Janie Slow Down is rush released in France by Byg Records. (The group is rumoured to have recorded 12 tracks for an album, although they are currently without a record contract. The sessions include contributions from ex-Family member Ric Grech.)

October (18) Balls’ debut UK live performance at the Lyceum in London fails to materialise. (The group was planning to record the show for a possible live album, but internal problems result in a cancellation of the show.) White subsequently leaves and Laine and Burton perform an acoustic set at their next show, held at Trent Poly, Nottingham. Shortly afterwards ex-Spooky Tooth drummer Mike Kellie agrees to join while singer Steve Gibbons is also added. The new line-up vows to undertake a UK tour in January 1971, but by then the group has broken up. Fight For My Country is released by Wizzard Records but fails to chart.

1971

July Laine forms a new group with bass player Steve Thompson, guitarist John Moorshead and drummer Peter Trout, who worked with The Electric String Band and rehearses material. However, Laine abandons the project when Paul McCartney invites the singer to join Wings in August.

Sources:

Bacon, Tony. ‘London Live’, Balafon Books, 1999.
Black, Johnny. ‘Blind Faith’. Mojo Magazine, July 1996.
Clayson, Alan. ‘Denny Laine’. Record Collector, #191, July 1995.
Clayson, Alan. Call Up The Groups – The Golden Age Of British Beat 1962-67. Blandford Press, 1985.
Dellar, Fred. ‘Time Machine’. Mojo Magazine, August 1997.
Doggett, Peter and Reed, John. ‘Looking Back at June 1968’. Record Collector #166, June 1993.
Gardner, Ken. Peel Sessions. BBC Books, 2007.
Hounsome, Terry. Rock Record #6. Record Researcher Publications, 1994.
King, Michael. Wrong Movements – The Robert Wyatt Story. SAF Publishing, 1994.
Laine, Denny. Denny Laine’s Guitar Book, Whizzard Press, 1979.
Paytress, Mark. ‘Reading Festival’. Record Collector, #216, August 1997.
Reed, John and Pelletier, Paul. ‘Middle Earth’. Record Collector, April 1996.
Rees, Dafydd and Crampton, Luke. Guinness Book Of Rock Stars, 2nd Edition. Guinness Publishing Ltd, 1989.
Wells, David. ‘Going Underground’. Record Collector, #216, August 1997.

Disc, April 15, 1967, page 4, May 6, 1967, page 6 and June 17, 1967, page 13.

Melody Maker, January 21, 1967, page 5; April 22, 1967, page 5; April 29, 1967, page 4; May 13, 1967, page 4; May 20, 1967, page 5; July 1, 1967, page 7; July 8, 1967, page 4; July 15, 1967, page 4; September 23, 1967, page 28; October 7, 1967, page 6; November 4, 1967, page 4; November 18, 1967, page 20; December 2, 1967, page 24; January 6, 1968, page 3; August 1, 1970, page 4; August 8, 1970, page 29; September 26, 1970, page 5; October 24, 1970, page 4 and November 14, 1970, page 14.

The Birmingham Evening Mail.

Many thanks to Peter Trout and Mike Lease for their memories of working with Denny Laine. Thanks also to Dave Allen.

© Copyright Nick Warburton, 2009. All Rights Reserved. No part of this article may be reproduced or transmitted in any from or by any means, without prior permission from the author.

To contact the author, email: Warchive@aol.com

Visit: www.nickwarburton.com

Special thanks to Jim Wynand for the scan of the Dutch sleeve and to MC for the rare Top Gear recordings.