Alva Starr

Alva Starr Golden 45 Clock on the WallAlva Starr Golden 45 Light of 1000 YearsAlva Starr was a character in the Tennessee Williams play This Property Is Condemned. Natalie Wood portrayed Alva Starr in the 1966 flim of the same name, with a screenplay written in part by Francis Ford Coppola.

Alva is not a common name now, but you may recall it was phonograph inventor Thomas Edison’s middle name. Alva Starr became the stage name for Alva Snelling, a songwriter and singer from, possibly, Denham Springs, Louisiana, a few miles east of Baton Rouge.

Snelling recorded two singles in August and September 1967 for the Baton Rouge label Golden Records, owned by Ebb-Tide, short for Ebenezer K. Harris.

The first, on Golden 102 is the psychedelic-garage classic “Clock on the Wall”, where Alva intones lyrics like “time has made slaves of us all … the clock ticks away at our destiny … the hands they move with such a pace as to control the lives of the human race” while the band vamps with a monotonous drum beat in the background.

The flip side is the bizarre and cool patriotic ode “Space Race to the Moon” which includes lyrics like “the moon must be free, because that’s the way God meant it to be”. Alva Snelling wrote both songs, published by Sano Pub. Co BMI.

His second single is another fine original “Light of 1000 Years” played with a defter touch than the first, and backed with a cover of Arthur Alexander’s “Anna”. Snelling registered “Light of 1000 Years” with the Library of Congress in March of 1966.

As to who was backing Alva Starr, one commentator on youtube suggests the band was named the Luvrakers. I can’t find info on the Luvrakers other than they had a guitarist named Susan Owens probably at a later date than these recordings.

Alva Starr Golden 45 AnnaAlva Starr and Ebb Tide produced both of these singles on “Golden=Records of La.” Golden Records had an address of PO Box 2544 in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. Both singles were released with gold-colored labels, though some copies of “Light of 1000 Years” have blue labels.

Alva Snellling seems to have died in 1995, but I can’t find confirmation of this.

Other than Alva Starr and an interesting release by a Detroit group, Organized Confusion, most releases on Golden Records were country or soul music. 45 Cat has a nearly complete discography.

Blue label version scan taken from Mojama Records.

Alva Starr Golden 45 Light of 1000 Years
Unusual blue label version of “Light of 1000 Years”

The Johnnys

Warner Bros Buys Valiant, Billboard April 22, 1967
Warner Bros Buys Valiant, April 22, 1967

The Johnnys Warner Bros 45 Nothing Sacred“Nothing Sacred” blends mournful sustained guitar with bright harmony vocals for a captivating song. Unfortunately it was relegated to the B-side of the only release by the Johnnys.

The Johnnys get a mention in an April 22, 1967 article in Billboard as one of the artist contracts transferred to Warner Bros when it purchased the Valiant Records label. Song writer Bodie Chandler is also named in the article. He and Edward McKendry wrote “Nothing Sacred”, and Chandler arranged the song. Chandler had been part of Barry & The Tamerlanes and has an extensive writing catalog.

The ostensible A-side is the more conventional “I Remember” written and arranged by Jack Walker. Both sides were published by Tamerlane Music, BMI

This single had release in July of 1967 on Warner Bros 7057. I can’t find any other mention of the Johnnys or who was in the group. I assume they were from California but that is only a guess. If anyone has more info please contact me.

The Johnnys Warner Bros 45 I Remember

The Phantoms – unknown band

The Phantoms, Concord Camera Club photo
The Phantoms, Concord Camera Club photo

Here’s a good photo of a band that would be anonymous but luckily the photo was mounted to a backing board which names the band as the Phantoms, and the photographer as Newell Wood of Ulfinian Way in Martinez, CA. It also tells that the photo placed second in the Concord California Club miniprints competition in June of 1966.

Martinez is about 8 miles from Concord, and the band could be from anywhere around the East Bay, Vallejo or Walnut Creek. I’m not aware of any group named the Phantoms from that area, or if they made any recordings.

The Phantoms photo detail
The Phantoms photo detail

The Phantoms, Concord Camera Club Photo Contest

Lord Douglas and the Serfs

Lord Douglas and the Serfs HR 45 Your Turn to CryLord Douglas and the Serfs were students at Hiram College, about 40 miles Southeast of Cleveland. Producer Howard Russell brought them to Cleveland radio station WSLR to record two originals for their only single on HR Records 606.

Gerald Johnson and Robert Kopp wrote “Your Turn to Cry” which features harmony vocals and a great bass line in the break. Kopp, Alexander and Smith wrote the flip side, “The Way of a Man” which has a catchy chorus and a brief subdued solo that reminds me of something on the Velvet Underground’s third LP.

The band registered “Your Turn to Cry” with the Library of Congress on August 29, 1966 but the single’s release date is approximately February 1967.

Lord Douglas and the Serfs HR 45 The Ways Of A Man

Freddie Mack’s bands February 1968-January 1969

Cover of Freddy Mack's Live album, re-released by Acid Jazz
Cover of Freddy Mack’s Live album, re-released by Acid Jazz

Retired American light-heavyweight boxer Freddie Mack, sometimes spelt Freddy Mack and also known as Mr Superbad, relocated to the UK in 1965 and established a second career as a soul singer and disc jockey.

Between late 1965 and the mid-1970s, Mack fronted a succession of bands featuring a staggering number of notable British R&B and soul musicians. Originally called The Mack Sound, the singer’s bands also worked under the names The Freddie Mack Sound, The Fantastic Freddie Mack Show and the Freddie Mack Extravaganza.

Thanks to tenor sax player Geoff Driscoll, it’s possible to pin down the line-up for Freddie Mack’s band from about February 1968 through to about January 1969.

According Driscoll, drummer Colin Davy left shortly before he joined (later playing with Joe Cocker among many others). The band, he adds, had just returned from playing the Blow Up club in Munich. When he hooked up with Freddie Mack, the band comprised:

Freddie Mack – lead vocals

Tony Morgan – lead vocals

Sonny Gibbons – lead vocals

Tony St Clair (Sinclair) – lead guitar

Roy Davies – organ

Alan Cartwright – bass

Sonny Corbett – trumpet

Phil Kenzie – tenor saxophone

Dave Potter – tenor saxophone

Geoff Driscoll – tenor saxophone

Dave Coxhill – baritone saxophone

Pete Hunt – drums

Of the new line-up, Pete Hunt came from the Southampton area and had worked with a number of bands, most notably The Quik, The Meddyevils and The Soul Agents.

Tony St Clair, who came from Hackney, had joined Phil Wainman’s band literally a few weeks after they’d played the Christmas/New Year show with Freddie Mack in 1965. He would remain with Wainman’s band as it became The New Generation and backed Jimmy Cliff during 1966. The formation then joined forces with Gary Hamilton and became The Hamilton Movement. When St Clair left in late 1967, it’s reported that he played with Lace.

Phil Kenzie of course had worked with Freddie Mack in 1966 and had gone on to play with Sonny Childe & The TNT, Tuesday’s Children and PP Arnold & TNT in the interim.

Geoff Driscoll recalls that the new line-up soon returned to the Blow Up club in Munich via a gig in Belgium and then travelled to Rome (around April/May 1968) to play at the famous Piper Club for three weeks. Some of the band met an RCA record executive who informed the musicians that the label was about to release a single by an actor that was going to be an enormous hit – it was Richard Harris’ “McArthur Park”.

However, after nearly a year of playing with Mack and moaning about not getting paid, the band split from the singer whereupon they were approached by Dave Hadfield to work as the house band (The Breed) at his Maximum Sound Studio on the Old Kent Road. The Breed backed a few reggae singers on Hadfield’s label before Manfred Mann got involved and lured the horn section away for Manfred Mann Chapter 3.

While Dave Coxhill and Sonny Corbett remained with Manfred Mann Chapter 3, Geoff Driscoll and Phil Kenzie reunited with Roy Davies and Alan Cartwright in Sweet Water Canal. Pete Hunt later worked with The Jess Roden Band among many others.

Notable gigs:

10 February 1968 – Starlight Ballroom, Boston Gliderdrome, Boston, Lincolnshire with The Informers and Plus 2

23 February 1968 – Birmingham University with Elmer Gantry

24 February 1968 – Burton’s, Uxbridge, Middlesex

 

8 March 1968 – Bradford University, Student Union with The Attack, The Quick Selection and The Collection (Source: https://100objectsbradford.files.wordpress.com/2013/05/music-at-the-students-union-1965-1979.pdf)

 

16 March 1968 – Chateau Impney, Droitwich, Worcestershire

31 March 1968 – Carlton Ballroom, Erdington, West Midlands

 

12 April 1968 – Flamingo Ballroom, Penzance, Cornwall (listed as 7-piece Mac Sounds)

13 April 1968 – Winter Gardens Ballroom, Penzance, Cornwall

14 April 1968 – Flamingo Ballroom, Penzance, Cornwall (listed as 15-piece)

15 April 1968 – Blue Lagoon, Newquay, Cornwall with Vigilantes (listed as 15-piece)

Most likely travelled to Munich via Belgium and then Piper Club, Rome here

8 June 1968 – Bull’s Head, Yardley, West Midlands

16 June 1968 – Mothers, Birmingham

25 June 1968 – Droitwich Winter Gardens, Droitwich, Worcestershire with Breakdown

 

6 July 1968 – The Swan, Yardley, West Midlands with Soul Express

20 July 1968 – Flamingo Ballroom, Redruth, Cornwall

 

14 August 1968 – Winter Gardens Ballroom, Penzance, Cornwall

15 August 1968 – Blue Lagoon, Newquay, Cornwall with Fire and Sons and Lovers

23 August 1968 – The Factory, Birmingham, West Midlands

 

7 September 1968 – Princess Pavilion, Falmouth, Cornwall with The Mood

 

6 October 1968 – Bull’s Head, Yardley, West Midlands

26 October 1968 – The Factory, Birmingham

 

4-6 November – Hatchettes Playground, London

 

13 December 1968 – The Factory, Birmingham with The Gun

21 December 1968 – The Swan, Yardley, West Midlands

 

GARAGE HANGOVER WOULD LIKE TO HEAR FROM ANYONE THAT CAN PROVIDE INFORMATION ABOUT THE 1969-1970 PERIOD.

I would personally like to thank Geoff Driscoll for helping to piece together this part of the band’s story. Thanks also to Greg Russo and Bruce Welsh.

PLEASE LEAVE COMMENTS BELOW TO ADD/CORRECT INFORMATION

Live gig sources:

During my research on Freddie Mack from 1965-1969, I have found gigs from the following sources:

The Cornish Guardian, Derby Evening Telegraph, Evening Sentinel, Melody Maker, West Briton & Royal Cornwall Gazette, Lincolnshire Guardian, Birmingham Evening Mail, NME, Northwich Chronicle, Sheffield Star, Warrington Guardian, Wrexham Leader

Copyright © Nick Warburton, 2015. All Rights Reserved. No part of this article may be reproduced or transmitted in any from or by any means, without prior permission from the author. To contact the author, email: Warchive@aol.com or nick_warburton@hotmail.com

 

Freddie Mack’s bands: April 1967-January 1968

Cover of Freddy Mack's Live album, re-released by Acid Jazz
Cover of Freddy Mack’s Live album, re-released by Acid Jazz

Retired American light-heavyweight boxer Freddie Mack, sometimes spelt Freddy Mack and also known as Mr Superbad, relocated to the UK in 1965 and established a second career as a soul singer and disc jockey.

Between late 1965 and the mid-1970s, Mack fronted a succession of bands featuring a staggering number of notable British R&B and soul musicians. Originally called The Mack Sound, the singer’s bands also worked under the names The Freddie Mack Sound, The Fantastic Freddie Mack Show and the Freddie Mack Extravaganza.

Thanks to the recollections of former Doc Thomas Group lead guitarist Dave Tedstone, who took over from Stuart Taylor on 5 April 1967, the band’s formation comprised the following when he joined:

Freddie Mack – lead vocals

Derry Wilkie – lead vocals

Tony Morgan – lead vocals, congas

Kenneth Harry – lead vocals

Kookie Eaton – lead vocals

Dave Tedstone – lead guitar

Roy Davies – organ

Alan Cartwright – bass

Dick Morrisey – tenor saxophone

Sonny Corbett – trumpet

Roger Truth – drums (replaced days later by Ron Berg and Terry Stannard on dual drums)

While this line-up appears to have remained quite stable, until at least November 1967, there were a few changes throughout the year.

Dave Tedstone remembers that Dick Morrisey departed sometime during the summer. Derry Wilkie left in June 1967 to pursue a solo career.

Ron Berg, who later went on to Blodwyn Pig among others, and Terry Stannard, who later played with Kokomo among others, both played drums after Roger Truth departed days after Tedstone joined.

Back cover of the Acid Jazz re-release
Back cover of the Acid Jazz re-release. The album was recorded in 1967 not 1966

Mistakenly credited to 1966, it was this formation (minus Derry Wilkie) that appeared on the album, The Fantastic Freddy Mack Show – ‘Live’ at ‘Toft’s Club’ Folkestone. Tedstone says that not many venues at the time had stages large enough to accommodate both drums so on the album, Stannard played the first set, and Berg the second.

However, future tenor sax player Geoff Driscoll reports that the album wasn’t recorded live but was in fact cut at Tony Pike’s studio and the crowd noise was dubbed on later.

Notable gigs:

5 April 1967 – Birmingham gig (marks Dave Tedstone’s debut)

6 April 1967 – Overseas Visitors Club, London

19 April 1967 – Weymouth, Dorset (most likely Steering Wheel)

20 April 1967 – Stafford (most likely Dorset)

21 April 1967 – Dorchester, Dorset (most likely Steering Wheel)

22 April 1967 – Nottingham (possibly one of the boat clubs)

23 April 1967 – Cromer, Norfolk

24 April 1967 – BBC recording

25 April 1967 – Concorde, Southampton, Hampshire

 

5 May 1967 – Upper Cut, Forest Gate, London with Bohemians

11 May 1967 – Overseas Visitors Club, London

12 May1967 – Hitchin, Hertfordshire

13 May 1967 – Gaiety Ballroom, Ramsey, Cambridgeshire

13 May 1967 – Nite Owl, Leicester

14 May 1967 – Garden Club (location not known but possibly London)

16 May 1967 – High Wycombe Town Hall, High Wycombe, Buckinghamshire

17 May 1967 – Eel Pie Island, Twickenham, Middlesex

18 May 1967 – Tiles, London

19 May 1967 – King Alfred’s College, Winchester, Hampshire

20 May 1967 – Maple Ballroom, Northampton

21 May 1967 – Swan, Yardley, West Midlands

22 May 1967 – Carlton Club, Erdington, West Midlands

23 May 1967 – Carlton Club, Warrington

24 May 1967 – Pavilion, Hemel Hempstead, Hertfordshire

26 May 1967 – Golden Diamond, Sutton in Ashfield

27 May 1967 – Tofts, Folkestone, Kent

29 May 1967 – Belfry Hotel, Sutton Coldfield

30 May 1967 – Beachcomber, Nottingham

31 May 1967 – RANS Lossiemouth, Scotland

 

1 June 1967 – RANS Arbroath, Scotland

2 June 1967 – Hawick, Scotland

3 June 1967 – Kelso, Scotland

4 June 1967 – Cosmo Club, Carlisle

5-8 June 1967 – Paris, France

9 June 1967 – Lee West Lanes, Bedford

10 June 1967 – Ad-Hocs Festival, Norwich

11 June 1967 – Beachcomber, Nottingham

12 June 1967 – Three Horseshoes, Letchworth

13 June 1967 – Concorde Club, Southampton

14 June 1967 – Eel Pie Island, Twickenham, Middlesex

17 June 1967 – Matlock Bath, Matlock, Derbyshire

18 June 1967 – Le Metro, Birmingham

19 June 1967 – Carton Club, Warrington

20 June 1967 – Ritz, Bournemouth

21 June 1967 – Princess Pavilion, Falmouth, Cornwall

22 June 1967 – Blue Lagoon, Newquay, Cornwall

23-24 June 1967 – Winter Gardens Ballroom, Penzance, Cornwall

25 June 1967 – Steering Wheel, Dorchester, Dorset

26 June 1967 – Cook’s Ferry Inn, Edmonton

28 June 1967 – De Valance Ballroom, Tenby

30 June 1967 – Pavilion, Hemel Hempstead, Hertfordshire

 

1 July 1967 – Burton’s, Uxbridge, Middlesex

2 July 1967 – Central Hotel, Gillingham, Kent

4 July 1967 – Concorde, Southampton, Hampshire

6 July 1967 – Huntington Youth Centre, Huntingdon, Cambridgeshire

7 July 1967 – California Ballroom, Dunstable, Hertfordshire

8 July 1967 – St George’s Ballroom, Hinckley, Leicestershire

9 July 1967 – Beachcomber, Nottingham

10 July 1967 – Melody Maker says they are recording

11 July 1967 – High Wycombe Town Hall, High Wycombe, Buckinghamshire

14 July 1967 – Grammar School, Gravesend, Kent

15 July 1967 – Tofts, Folkestone, Kent

16 July 1967 – Golden Torch, Tunstall, Staffordshire

18 July 1967 – Assembly Hall, Aylesbury, Buckinghamshire

19 July 1967 – Blue Lagoon, Newquay, Cornwall

23 July 1967 – Eel Pie Island, Twickenham, Middlesex

25 July 1967 – Carlton Club, Erdington, West Midlands

27 July 1967 – RAF Witham, Lincolnshire

28 July 1967 – Pavilion, Hemel Hempstead, Hertfordshire

29 July 1967 – Memorial Hall, Barry, Glamorgan, Wales

30 July 1967 – Swan, Yardley, West Midlands

 

1-2 August 1967 – Paris, France

9 August 1967 – Princess Pavilion, Falmouth, Cornwall with Modesty Blues

10 August 1967 – Blue Lagoon, Newquay, Cornwall with The Californians

12 August 1967 – Flamingo Ballroom, Redruth, Cornwall

14 August 1967 – Whisky A Go Go, London

15 August 1967 – High Wycombe Town Hall, High Wycombe, Buckinghamshire

16 August 1967 – Scotland

18 August 1967 – Gay Tower Ballroom, Edgbaston with Bobby Johnson Big Band

19 August 1967 – Burton’s, Uxbridge, Middlesex

21 August 1967 – Carlton Club, Warrington, Cheshire

22 August 1967 – Beau Brummel Club, Nantwich, Cheshire

25 August 1967 – Caesars, Bedford, Bedfordshire

26-27 August 1967 – Tofts, Folkestone, Kent

28 August 1967 – Hemel Hempstead Town Hall, Hertfordshire

29 August 1967 – Ritz Ballroom, Bournemouth, Dorset

30 August 1967 – Tropicana Club, Croydon, Surrey

31 August 1967 – Scottish tour commences to 8 September

 

5 September 1967 – Two Red Shoes, Elgin (billed as Freddie Mack Show) (Source: https://tworedshoes.wordpress.com/)

8 September 1967 – Ballerina Ballroom, Nairn, Scotland

8 September 1967 – Civic, Wrexham, Wales with Dynamic Honey and System 5 (unlikely considering other Scottish dates)

9 September 1967 – Aberdeen

10 September 1967 – RNAS Lossiemouth, Moray, Scotland

11-12 September 1967 – Scotland

13 September 1967 – Belgium

29 September 1967 – Flamingo, London with The Gabb and Scots of St James

30 September 1967 – Tin Hat, Kettering

 

1 October 1967 – Co-op Hall, Warrington, Cheshire

2 October 1967 – Park Hall, Wolverhampton, West Midlands

4 October 1967 – Hemel Hempstead Town Hall, Hertfordshire

6 October 1967 – Il Rondo, Leicester

7 October 1967 – Enfield College of Technology

8 October 1967 – Le Metro, Birmingham

9 October 1967 – St Matthew’s Bath Hall, Ipswich

12 October 1967 – Brays Grove Youth Club, Harlow, Essex

13 October 1967 – Pavilion Ballroom, Weymouth, Dorset

14 October 1967 – Tofts, Folkestone, Kent

15 October 1967 – Corn Exchange, Maidstone

16 October 1967 – 100 Club, London

17 October 1967 – Concorde, Southampton

18 October 1967 – Travel to Paris

19-30 October 1967 – Belgium

31 October 1967 – Shenley Green Youth Club, Birmingham

 

2 November 1967 – Golden Torch, Tunstall, Staffordshire

3 November 1967 – Apex Club, Ashford, Kent

4 November 1967 – Earlham Park, Norwich

5 November 1967 – Cosmo Club, Carlisle

6 November 1967 – Quaintways, Chester

7 November 1967 – Ritz, Bournemouth, Dorset

8 November 1967 – Skyline Ballroom, Hull

10 November 1967 – Mayfair Ballroom, Birmingham

11 November 1967 – Bradford University, Student Union

12 November 1967 – South Bank Jazz Club, Grimsby

13 November 1967 – 100 Club, London

15 November 1967 – The Catacombs, Eastbourne

17 November 1967 – Topspot Ballroom, Ross-on-Wye

18 November 1967 – Royal Lido, Prestayn, Wales

19 November 1967 – Beau Brummel Club, Nantwich, Cheshire with Jaytree Organisation

20 November 1967 – Bamboo Club, Stockport

 

21-26 November 1967 – Dates in Scotland

21 November 1967 – Two Red Shoes, Elgin (billed as Freddie Mack & His Road Show) (advert lists 16-piece band) (Source: https://tworedshoes.wordpress.com/)

 

27 November 1967 – Carlton Club, Warrington, Cheshire

29 November 1967 – Reading Town Hall, Reading

Around December 1967, Colin Davy, who’d briefly been a member of Georgie Fame’s post Blue Flames band, took over the drum stool.

However, sometime in January 1968, Dave Tedstone departed to join Jimmy James & The Vagabonds (and briefly reunited with Colin Davy in Geno Washington & The Ram Jam Band in July/August 1968 for some recordings).

Notable dates:

7 December 1967 – Medway College of Art, Rochester, Kent

8 December 1967 – Southampton University

9 December 1967 – Clacton Town Hall, Clacton, Essex

10 December 1967 – Samantha’s, Bournemouth, Dorset

11 December 1967 – St Matthew’s Bath Halls, Ipswich

12 December 1967 – Keele University

14 December 1967 – RAF Whitton

15 December 1967 – Red Spot Club, Leicester

16 December 1967 – Night Prowler, Yarmouth, Norfolk

17 December 1967 – Leofric Hotel, Coventry

19 December 1967 – Queen’s Hotel, Grays, Essex

 

13 January 1968 – Winter Gardens Ballroom, Penzance, Cornwall

 

STORY CONTINUED

I would personally like to thank Dave Tedstone for helping to piece this part of the story together.

PLEASE LEAVE COMMENTS BELOW TO ADD/CORRECT INFORMATION

Live gig sources:

During my research on Freddie Mack from 1965-1969, I have found gigs from the following sources:

The Cornish Guardian, Derby Evening Telegraph, Evening Sentinel, Melody Maker, West Briton & Royal Cornwall Gazette, Lincolnshire Guardian, Birmingham Evening Mail, NME, Northwich Chronicle, Sheffield Star, Warrington Guardian, Wrexham Leader

Copyright © Nick Warburton, 2015. All Rights Reserved. No part of this article may be reproduced or transmitted in any from or by any means, without prior permission from the author. To contact the author, email: Warchive@aol.com or nick_warburton@hotmail.com

 

 

The Tridents

John Lucas – rhythm guitar

Mike Jopp – lead guitar

Paul Lucas – bass/vocals

Ray Cook – drums

Chiswick band The Tridents were formed in 1963 with the above line up and are best known for containing Jeff Beck in their ranks from around July 1964-March 1965.

According to Christopher Hjort and Doug Hinman in their excellent, Jeff’s Book, Mike Jopp left The Tridents when the musicians decided to go professional.

Lead guitarist Pete Hammerton says that he played with The Tridents for a few weeks in 1963 before the band went to Germany to play some dates. He adds that the singer was Barry Bunting and the drummer was Dave Nibblett, who had previously played with Hammerton in another Chiswick band called The Blue Jays. It’s not clear, however, whether he replaced Ray Cook or whether another drummer was there at the outset.

Soon after, Hammerton left to play with Unit 5 before joining Hampton, Middlesex band, The Others in the summer of 1964.

In February 1964, The Tridents signed up with The Rik Gunnel Agency by which point, lead guitarist Leslie Jones had replaced Hammerton and Lindsay Bex, who’d previously played with Mike Forde & The Fortunes, had joined on drums.

It was this formation that sent an application to the BBC on 9 March to request an audition, which, according to Hjort and Hinman in their book, was politely rejected. The group also started playing regularly at Eel Pie Island during this time.

During the summer of 1964, the Lucas brothers asked Jones to leave after seeing Jeff Beck playing with The Nightshift, who had shared the bill with The Tridents at Eel Pie Island.

Around September, Lindsay Bex was also given the elbow and Ray Cook returned to the band’s line-up. Lindsay Bex later worked with Magic Roundabout.

When Jeff Beck left to join The Yardbirds in March 1965, original lead guitarist Mike Jopp returned and remained until the band split in spring 1966. Ray Cook then joined Sands (featuring former member Pete Hammerton) while Jopp later played with Affinity.

Notable gigs:

18 March 1964 – Ealing Club, Ealing, Middlesex (start playing Wednesdays)

25 March 1964 – Ealing Club, Ealing, Middlesex (needs confirmation)

 

1 April 1964 – Ealing Club, Ealing, Middlesex (needs confirmation)

8 April 1964 – Ealing Club, Ealing, Middlesex (needs confirmation)

14 April 1964 – 100 Club, Oxford Street with Mark Leeman Five and The Pretty Things

22 April 1964 – Cellar Club, Kingston Upon Thames, Surrey

 

6 May 1964 – Ealing Club, Ealing, Middlesex (could be when Jeff Beck joins – needs confirmation)

20 May 1964 – Ealing Club, Ealing, Middlesex

27 May 1964 – Cellar Club, Kingston Upon Thames, Surrey (may also play Ealing Club today)

29 May 1964 – Ealing Club, Ealing, Middlesex

 

3 June 1964 – Ealing Club, Ealing, Middlesex

17 June 1964 – Ealing Club, Ealing, Middlesex

24 June 1964 – Ealing Club, Ealing, Middlesex

 

1 July 1964 – Ealing Club, Ealing, Middlesex

2 July 1964 – 100 Club, Oxford Street

10 July 1964 – Ealing Club, Ealing, Middlesex

13 July 1964 – The Attic, Hounslow, Middlesex

15 July 1964 – Ealing Club, Ealing, Middlesex

16 July 1964 – 100 Club, Oxford Street

17 July 1964 – Ealing Club, Ealing, Middlesex

23 July 1964 – 100 Club, Oxford Street

28 July 1964 – 100 Club, Oxford Street

 

3 August 1964 – 100 Club, Oxford Street

10 August 1964 – 100 Club, Oxford Street

12 August 1964 – Ealing Club, Ealing, Middlesex

13 August 1964 – Studio 51, Leicester Square

14-15 August 1964 – All Nighter Club, Windsor, Berkshire

17 August 1964 – 100 Club, Oxford Street with The Birds

19 August 1964 – Ealing Club, Ealing, Middlesex

20 August 1964 – Studio 51, Leicester Square

22 August 1964 – Studio 51, Leicester Square

23 August 1964 – Flamingo Club, Soho, London with Georgie Fame & The Blue Flames

23 August 1964 – Studio 51, Leicester Square

24 August 1964 – 100 Club, Oxford Street with The Birds

27 August 1964 – Studio 51, Leicester Square

31 August 1964 – 100 Club, Oxford Street

 

3 September 1964 – Studio 51, Leicester Square

10 September 1964 – Studio 51, Leicester Square

17 September 1964 – 100 Club, Oxford Street

17 September 1964 – Studio 51, Leicester Square

19 September 1964 – Playhouse, Walton-on-Thames, Surrey

24 September 1964 – Studio 51, Leicester Square

26 September 1964 – The Cavern, Olympia, Reading, Berkshire

29 September 1964 – 100 Club, Oxford Street with Brian Knight’s Blues By Six

 

15 October 1964 – 100 Club, Oxford Street with The Epitaphs

29 October 1964 – 100 Club, Oxford Street with Blues By Night

 

7 November 1964 – Playhouse, Walton-on-Thames, Surrey

10 November 1964 – 100 Club, Oxford Street with Brian Knight’s Blues By Six

17 November 1964 – 100 Club, Oxford Street

24 November 1964 – 100 Club, Oxford Street

 

4 December 1964 – East Ham Town Hall with The Herd

8 December 1964 – 100 Club, Oxford Street with The Long and The Short and The Tall

15 December 1964 – 100 Club, Oxford Street with King B Four

19 December 1964 – Mitcham R&B Club, Romany Dance Hall, Mitcham, Surrey

26 December 1964 – Playhouse, Walton-on-Thames, Surrey

 

30 January 1965 – Playhouse, Walton-on-Thames, Surrey

 

6 February 1965 – Playhouse, Walton-on-Thames, Surrey

9 February 1965 – 100 Club, Oxford Street

13 February 1965 – Waterfront Club, Southampton, Hants

15 February 1965 – 100 Club, Oxford Street

23 February 1965 – 100 Club, Oxford Street

 

6 March 1965 – Playhouse, Walton-on-Thames, Surrey

This is a very brief overview of The Tridents career and Garage Hangover would welcome any further information for a more complete story. Please contact the writer at Warchive@aol.com or nick_warburton@hotmail.com

Gig sources:

Playhouse, Walton-on-Thames (Woking Herald), Cellar, Kingston Upon Thames (Surrey Comet), Ealing Club (Middlesex County Times & West Middlesex Gazette), 100 Club and Studio 51 (Melody Maker). Remaining gigs sourced from Christopher Hjort and Doug Hinman Jeff’s Book.

Many thanks to Lindsay Bex for providing some more information on The Tridents

The Five Embers

Gary Boyle – guitar/vocals

Roger Sutton – bass/vocals

Ray Deville – organ/vocals

Ron Foster – saxophone

Clive Thacker – drums

Lead guitarist Gary Boyle, bass player Roger Sutton, keyboard player Ray Deville, drummer Clive Thacker and sax players Dave Quincy and Ian Thomas had backed singer Brian Bentley as Brian Bentley & The Kingsmen during 1962.

In early 1963, the remaining members (minus Quincy and Thomas) became The Five Embers after ditching Brian Bentley and recruiting sax player Ron Foster. Initially, the musicians played under their own name and then in March 1964 started backing Jamaican singer Millie.

Notable gigs as The Five Embers:

22 March 1964 – Star & Garter, Windsor, Berkshire

24 March 1964 – Café Des Artistes, Fulham, Middlesex

Notable gigs with Millie Small:

25 March 1964 – Bromley Court Hotel, Bromley, Kent

28 March 1964 – Café Des Artistes, Fulham, Middlesex

29 March 1964 – Star & Garter, Windsor, Berkshire

31 March 1964 – Peter’s Club, High Wycombe, Bucks

 

5-11 April 1964 – Cavern, Liverpool

 

16 May 1964 – City Hall, Salisbury, Wiltshire with The Initials

17 May 1964 – Blackpool ABC, Blackpool, Lancashire

18 May 1964 – Scarborough Futurist, Scarborough with others

 

5 June 1964 – Palace Ballroom, Maryport, Cumbria with The Defenders

16 June 1964 – Locarno, Swindon, Wiltshire with The Soul Agents

 

27 August 1964 – ABC Theatre, Plymouth, Cornwall with Rolling Stones and others

 

After splitting with Millie, The Five Embers continued to gig into 1965 before breaking up that spring.

In August 1966, Clive Thacker joined Julie Driscol, Brian Auger & The Trinity and was joined two months later by Roger Sutton.

While Thacker remained with Brian Auger and Julie Driscol throughout the late 1960s, Sutton left in May 1967 and played with several groups before briefly joining The Krew in August 1968.

Roger Sutton subsequently played with a number of notable bands, including The Aynsley Dunbar Retaliation, Nucleus, Mark-Almond and Riff Raff.

Gary Boyle initially played with Lulu’s backing band during 1965. Then, in 1966, he worked with Dusty Springfield’s support group, The Echoes before reuniting with Roger Sutton and Clive Thacker in Julie Driscol, Brian Auger and The Trinity in January 1967.

After leaving in November of that year, Boyle subsequently played with Eclection in March 1969 and then returned to Julie Driscol and The Brian Auger Trinity that June.

Ray Deville meanwhile joined The Missing Links in February 1966 and stayed with this band when it took on the name, The All Night Workers in October 1967. He left in January 1968 and is rumoured to have worked with Dusty Springfield. Deville died in 2013.

Please note: this is a very brief overview of the band and its history. Garage Hangover would welcome any additional material and corrections.

Mike Collins’s interviews with Roger Sutton and Gary Boyle were really useful resources. Please see above links to his work.

Magic Roundabout

Dave Martin Group, 1966. Left to right: Dave Martin, John Chinnery, Roger Flavell and Albert Woodward.  Photo credit: John Chinnery
Dave Martin Group, 1966. Left to right: Dave Martin, John Chinnery, Roger Flavell and Albert Woodward. Photo credit:  Roger Flavell

This West London band’s roots can be found in The Dave Martin Group, which was formed around September 1966.

The original formation comprised:

Martin Thomas (aka Dave Martin) – lead vocals

John Chinnery – guitar/vocals

Roger Flavell – bass/vocals

Albert Woodward – drums

The Dave Martin Group was managed by John Chinnery’s older brother Geoff, who’d played with Mike Forde & The Fortunes in the late 1950s and early 1960s and briefly managed The Tridents (with a young Jeff Beck).

Guitarist John Chinnery had started out in a Hillingdon school band with Richard Walker and John Morgan. Albert Woodward, who attended another local school, completed the group.

Woodward introduced Martin Thomas and Roger Flavell and together with John Chinnery, the quartet began rehearsing at Ickenham Hall near Ruislip, Middlesex.

According to John’s brother Geoff Chinnery’s detailed gig list (complete with earnings for each performance), the new outfit’s debut show appears to have taken place on 28 October 1966 (most likely) at the Fisheries in Harefield, Middlesex. The gig list notes that The Dave Martin Group played at the same venue on 11, 18-19 and 26 November and also 3-4, 11 and 17 December.

The following gigs are then listed (during which period Roger Flavell was briefly replaced on bass while he had his tonsils out. John Chinnery suspects it was his school friend John Morgan, who covered Flavell’s absence).

Dave Martin Group gigs:

21 December 1966 – Ickenham Hall, Ickenham, Middlesex

23 December 1966 – Warburton Arms, Hackney

24 December 1966 – Harefield Football Club, Harefield, Middlesex

30 December 1966 – Warburton Arms, Hackney

31 December 1966 – the Fisheries, Harefield, Middlesex

 

6 January 1967 – Warburton Arms, Hackney

7 January 1967 – the Fisheries, Harefield, Middlesex

14 January 1967 – the Fisheries, Harefield, Middlesex

21 January 1967 – the Fisheries, Harefield, Middlesex

24 January 1967 – Kew Boathouse, Kew, Surrey

28 January 1967 – the Fisheries, Harefield, Middlesex (Roger Flavell returns after this show)

29 January 1967 – Hesden Hall, Ruislip, Middlesex

31 January 1967 – Kew Boathouse, Kew, Surrey

 

4 February 1967 – Warburton Arms, Hackney

5 February 1967 – the Fisheries, Harefield, Middlesex

8-9 February 1967 – Kew Boathouse, Kew, Surrey

10 February 1967 – Warburton Arms, Hackney

11 February 1967 – the Fisheries, Harefield, Middlesex

13-16 February 1967 – Kew Boathouse, Kew, Surrey

17-18 February 1967 – Warburton Arms, Hackney

19 February 1967 – the Fisheries, Harefield, Middlesex

20-23 February 1967 – Kew Boathouse, Kew, Surrey

26 February 1967 – the Fisheries, Harefield, Middlesex

27 February-2 March 1967 – Kew Boathouse, Kew, Surrey

 

4 March 1967 – Hanwell Sports Club, Hanwell, Middlesex

5 March 1967 – the Fisheries, Harefield, Middlesex

6-9 March 1967 – Kew Boathouse, Kew, Surrey

12 March 1967 – the Fisheries, Harefield, Middlesex

13 March 1967 – Kew Boathouse, Kew, Surrey

Dave Martin Group, 1967. Left to right: Lindsey Bex, Roger Flavell, John Chinnery and Dave Martin. Photo credit: John Chinnery
Dave Martin Group, 1967. Left to right: Lindsay Bex, Roger Flavell, John Chinnery and Dave Martin. Photo credit: Roger Flavell

At this point, Lindsay Bex replaced Albert Woodward on drums, who later became a percussion lecturer.

Older than the others, Lindsay Bex had worked with Geoff Chinnery in Mike Forde & The Fortunes during the late 1950s and early 1960s. In early 1964, Bex joined Chiswick band, The Tridents (who were managed by Geoff Chinnery). He remained with the group until about September 1964 during which time Jeff Beck joined on lead guitar.

In early 1965, Bex went to Germany for three months with The Redcaps and then played with various scratch bands before returning to Germany in 1966 to play American air bases with The Kathy Sampson Set. When Albert Woodward left suddenly, he accepted the call to join.

 

Dave Martin Group gigs (continued):

14-16 March 1967 – Kew Boathouse, Kew, Surrey

18 March 1967 – Wedding reception, Teddington, Middlesex

20-23 March 1967 – Kew Boathouse, Kew, Surrey

24 March 1967 – Blue Coat Boy, Bishopsgate, City of London

25 March 1967 – Wedding reception, Old Kent Road, London

26 March 1967 – the Fisheries, Harefield, Middlesex

27-30 March 1967 – Kew Boathouse, Kew, Surrey

31 March 1967 – All Stars Club, Artillery Passage, Liverpool Street, London (audition)

 

2 April 1967 – the Fisheries, Harefield, Middlesex

3-6 April 1967 – Kew Boathouse, Kew, Surrey

7 April 1967 – West Dulwich Sports Club, West Dulwich

8 April 1967 – Derwentwater Club, Acton, Middlesex

9 April 1967 – the Fisheries, Harefield, Middlesex

15 April 1967 – The Pheasant, South Oxhey, Watford

17 April 1967 – Whisky A Go Go, London (audition)

22 April 1967 – Saracens Rugby Club, Finchley, Middlesex

23 April 1967 – the Fisheries, Harefield, Middlesex

27 April 1967 – Byron Hotel, Greenford, Middlesex (audition)

30 April 1967 – the Fisheries, Harefield, Middlesex

 

7 May 1967 – the Fisheries, Harefield, Middlesex

8 May 1967 – St Moritz Club, Wardour Street, London (audition)

13 May 1967 – Rank Xerox private party, Denham, Buckinghamshire

14 May 1967 – the Fisheries, Harefield, Middlesex

19 May 1967 – Kew Boathouse, Kew, Surrey

20 May 1967 – Rank Xerox, Denham, Buckinghamshire

27 May 1967 – Civic Hall, Guildford, Surrey with Five Proud Walkers

28 May 1967 – the Fisheries, Harefield, Middlesex

 

3 June 1967 – Wedding Reception, Tea Rooms, Kenton, Middlesex

4 June 1967 – Byron Hotel, Greenford, Middlesex

8 June 1967 – RAF Northwood

9 June 1967 – Unknown venue, Purfleet, Essex

10 June 1967 – Clay Pigeon, Eastcote, Middlesex

12-15 June 1967 – Kew Boathouse, Kew, Surrey

16 June 1967 – ILI Co, Wembley, Middlesex

17 June 1967 – Pavilion, Hemel Hempstead, Hertfordshire

19-23 June 1967 – Kew Boathouse, Kew, Surrey

23 June 1967 – UKAEA, Harwell, Oxfordshire with Brian Poole & The Unity

24 June 1967 – Wedding reception, Hendon, Middlesex

26-29 June 1967 – Kew Boathouse, Kew, Surrey

30 June 1967 – Greenway School, Uxbridge, Middlesex

During 1967, the band recorded a couple of demos at a studio in Denham, Buckinghamshire comprising Martin Thomas/Roger Flavell co-writes.

 

Dave Martin Group gigs (continued): 

3-6 July 1967 – Kew Boathouse, Kew, Surrey

8 July 1967 – Rank Xerox, Denham, Buckinghamshire

20 July 1967 – Pinn Club, RAF Uxbridge

28 July 1967 – Epsom Youth Club, Epsom, Surrey

29 July 1967 – Pavilion, Hemel Hempstead, Hertfordshire

 

5 August 1967 – Thames Boat Trip, Westminster to Teddington

6 August 1967 – Clay Pigeon, Eastcote, Middlesex

12 August 1967 – Thing-a-me-jig, Reading, Berkshire

 

31 August 1967 – Sword & Wheel Club, RAF Northolt

At midnight, immediately after finishing the gig at RAF Northolt near Ruislip, the band had to pack up in order to drive down to Dover to catch the ferry to the continent and only just made the boat by the ‘skin of their teeth’. Having just turned professional, The Dave Martin Group changed its name to The Magic Roundabout and headed to Germany and then Switzerland.

Magic Roundabout in Bad Vilbel. Left to right: Roger Flavell, Dave Martin, John Chinnery and roadie Stuart Cook. Photo credit: John Chinnery
Magic Roundabout in Bad Vilbel. Left to right: Roger Flavell, Dave Martin, John Chinnery and roadie Stuart Cook. Photo credit: Roger Flavell

The Magic Roundabout gigs:

1-30 September 1967 – Ritterkelleer (9 performances) and Western Club (11 performances), Bad Vilbel, Frankfurt

1-15 October 1967 – Haus Der Music, Wuppertal, Germany (15 performances)

 

Arriving in Zurich, Switzerland, the band now briefly includes organist Dave Eldridge, a musician from Leicester, whose group has returned home after fulfilling commitments in Frankfurt.

16 October-1 November 1967 – ‘Beat Club’, Hotel Hirschen, Zurich, Switzerland (17 performances) (Eldridge leaves after this gig)

 

3-6 November 1967 – ‘Taverns Bar’, Ingolstadt, Germany (4 performances) (the band’s final night is cancelled; a fight had broken out the previous night between US servicemen and German police and the club was wrecked. The club is closed for refurbishment and The Magic Roundabout head home to the UK.)

On the band’s return to the UK, organist John Elliott joined. Elliott had previously played with Ealing band, Magnus Pike with lead guitarist/singer Jerry Smith, bass player Roger Searle and drummer Tony Haslam. Searle and Haslam will later go on to work with The Who’s road crew.

Magic Roundabout’s new line up comprised:

Martin Thomas (aka Dave Martin) – lead vocals

John Chinnery – lead guitar/vocals

John Elliott – organ/vocals

Roger Flavell – bass/vocals

Lindsay Bex – drums

 

The Magic Roundabout gigs (continued):

17 November 1967 – Women’s teachers’ training college (location not known)

18 November 1967 – Young Conservative’s Club, Twickenham, Middlesex

25 November 1967 – YMCA, Baldock, Hertfordshire

 

4-7 December 1967 – Kew Boathouse, Kew, Surrey

8 December 1967 – Guild Hall, Ilford, Essex

9 December 1967 – The Pavilion, Hemel Hempstead, Hertfordshire

15 December 1967 – Gillettes, Great West Road with Fortunes and Episode Six

16 December 1967 – RAF Feltwell

23 December 1967 – Rugby Club, Upton Park, Slough, Berkshire

26 December 1967 – Halfway House, Dunstable, Hertfordshire

31 December 1967 – Sword & Wheel Club, RAF Northolt

 

1-4 January 1968 – Kew Boathouse, Kew, Surrey

5 January 1968 – Youth Club, West Drayton, Middlesex

6 January 1968 – Baker’s Row Club, Cardiff (Bex’s bass drums falls off the roof rack on the way)

12 January 1968 – USAF Woodbridge, Suffolk

13 January 1968 – Hanwell Community Centre, Hanwell, Middlesex

20 January 1968 – Mildway Tavern, Highbury

24-25 January 1968 – Mildway Tavern, Highbury

26 January 1968 – Scotch of St James, Mayfair

27 January 1968 – Kodak Hall, Hemel Hempstead, Hertfordshire

30 January 1968 – BBC Maida Vale (audition)

31 January-1 February 1968 – Mildway Tavern, Highbury

 

Magic Roundabout, spring 1968. Left to right: Miki Anthony, Lindsey Bex, John Elliott, John Chinnery and Roger Flavell. Photo credit: John Chinnery
Magic Roundabout, spring 1968. Left to right: Miki Anthony, Lindsay Bex, John Elliott, John Chinnery and Roger Flavell. Photo credit: Roger Flavell

 

2 February 1968 – Northcote Arms, Southall, Middlesex

3 February 1968 – Queen’s Hall, Halstead, Braintree, Essex

10 February 1968 – Thing-a-me-jig, Reading, Berkshire

12-15 February 1968 – Kew Boathouse, Kew, Surrey

16 February 1968 – Northcote Arms, Southall, Middlesex

17 February 1968 – Rank Xerox, Denham, Buckinghamshire

21 February 1968 – Club A Go Go, Newcastle Upon Tyne

29 February 1968 – Bluebell Inn, Hackenthorpe, Sheffield, South Yorkshire

 

1 March 1968 – County Ballroom, Carlisle, Cumbria

2 March 1968 – Sheridan Rooms, Huddersfield, West Yorkshire

3 March 1968 – Woodhouse WMC, Sheffield, South Yorkshire

8 March 1968 – RAF Club, Tredegar, Wales

9 March 1968 – Howard Winstone Club, Merthyr, Wales

10 March 1968 – Beech Grove, Pengham, Wales

13 March 1968 – Faculty of Technology, Manchester

14 March 1968 – Bluebell Inn, Hackenthorpe, Sheffield, South Yorkshire

15 March 1968 – Northcote Arms, Southall, Middlesex

18 March 1968 – Quaintways, Chester, Cheshire

24 March 1968 – The Pheasant, South Oxhey, Watford, Hertfordshire

25-27 March 1968 – Kew Boathouse, Kew, Surrey

29 March 1968 – Brighton Tech College, Brighton, West Sussex

After the above gig, singer Michael Derrick (aka Miki Anthony) took over from Martin Thomas and brought his own manager with him (which would see the band split with Geoff Chinnery).

 

The Magic Roundabout gigs (continued):

20 April 1968 – Northcote Arms, Southall, Middlesex

21 April 1968 – Warmingham Grange Country Club, Sandbach, Cheshire

26 April 1968 – Kiosk Ballroom, Castleford, West Yorkshire

27 April 1968 – Sheridan Rooms, Huddersfield, West Yorkshire

28 April 1968 – The Pavilion, Bournemouth, Dorset

29 April-2 May 1968 – Kew Boathouse, Kew, Surrey

 

3 May 1968 – Bluebell Inn, Hackenthorpe, Sheffield, South Yorkshire

4 May 1968 – Morley Town Hall, Morley, West Yorkshire

5 May 1968 – Woodhill, WMC, Normanton, West Yorkshire

11 May 1968 – Bradford University with Jeff Beck Group

17 May 1968 – Board of Trade, Eastcote, Middlesex

18 May 1968 – Faculty of Technology, Manchester with Fleetwood Mac

19 May 1968 – Warmingham Grange Country Club, Sandbach, Cheshire

23 May 1968 – Arundel WMC, Sheffield, South Yorkshire

24-25 May 1968 – Raven Club, RAF Waddington

26 May 1968 – Kiosk Ballroom, Castleford, West Yorkshire

30 May 1968 – Kimbleworth Park Social Club, Rotherham, South Yorkshire

31 May 1968 – 270 Discotheque, Barnsley, West Yorkshire

Sometime around this time, the group recorded a cover of The Bee Gees’ “I Am The World”, which is never released.

 

Magic Roundabout, 1968. Left to right: Roger Flavell, John Elliott, John Chinnery, Miki Anthony and Lindsey Bex. Photo credit: John Chinnery
Magic Roundabout, 1968. Left to right: Roger Flavell, John Elliott, John Chinnery, Miki Anthony and Lindsay Bex. Photo credit: Roger Flavell

 

The Magic Roundabout gigs (continued):

1 June 1968 – Manchester University

8 June 1968 – The Pavilion, Weymouth, Dorset

14 June 1968 – The Place, Hanley, Staffordshire

15 June 1968 – Alexander Hall, Halifax, South Yorkshire with Jackson Union

20 June 1968 – Kimbleworth Park Social Club, Rotherham, South Yorkshire

21 June 1968 – Woodhill, WMC, Normanton, West Yorkshire

22 June 1968 – Morley Town Hall, Morley, West Yorkshire

24-27 June 1968 – Kew Boathouse, Kew, Surrey

28 June 1968 – Shades, Sheffield, South Yorkshire

29 June 1968 – University of Aston, Birmingham

30 June 1968 – Arundel WMC, Sheffield, South Yorkshire

 

1 July 1968 – Wilbeck Country Club, Hatfield, near Doncaster, South Yorkshire

2 July 1968 – Top Ranke Suite, Southampton, Hants

5 July 1968 – Cossack Club, Sir James Altham School, Oxhey, Watford, Hertfordshire

6 July 1968 – Bellpunch, Uxbridge, Middlesex

14 July 1968 – Industrial Club, Norwich, Norfolk

18 July 1968 – Cossack Club, Sir James Altham School, Oxhey, Watford, Hertfordshire

19 July 1968 – Victoria & Bull, Dartford, Kent

20 July 1968 – Bourne School, Ruislip Manor, Middlesex

25 July 1968 – Oasis Club, RAF Biggin Hill, Kent

26 July 1968 – Catacombe, Eastbourne, East Sussex

28 July 1968 – A Train, Hayes, Middlesex

29 July-1 August 1968 – Kew Boathouse, Kew, Surrey

 

2 August 1968 – Harrow Inn, Woolwich

3 August 1968 – Thing-a-me-jig, Reading, Berkshire

10 August 1968 – Airman’s Club, USAF, West Ruislip, Middlesex

11 August 1968 – Wake Arms, Epping, Essex

16 August 1968 – Kiosk Ballroom, Castleford, West Yorkshire

17 August 1968 – Black Swan, Sheffield, South Yorkshire

18 August 1968 – Manor House, near Skipton, North Yorkshire

20 August 1968 – Almonbury WMC, Huddersfield, West Yorkshire

21 August 1968 – Ponderose, Barnsley, West Yorkshire

22 August 1968 – Blue Bell, Sheffield, South Yorkshire

24 August 1968 – Morley Town Hall, Morley, West Yorkshire

30 August 1968 – RAF Whitton, Middlesex

Michael Derrick’s manager informed the band that he would take the singer away unless he can assume sole management and the musicians begrudgingly agreed as Geoff Chinnery had been managing them from the outset. Soon afterwards, Lindsay Bex and John Elliott both departed following the RAF Whitton gig, which (ironically) Chinnery believes was the band’s best performance to date.

Two weeks later, it was clear that the group’s career had ground to a halt and the band broke up. While Chinnery briefly abandoned a musical career and returned to work in insurance, Flavell subsequently joined Grand Union, the backing band for US soul act, Johnny Johnson & The Bandwagon in 1969.

In late 1970, Flavell briefly played with Geno Washington before working with Tony Hazzard/Richard Barnes, Judd, Kris Ife and The Tommy Hunt Band. In the early Seventies, Flavell joined Christie and then went on to Johnny Wakelin & The Kinshasha Band, The Lonnie Donegan Band and The David Byron Band.

Miki Anthony meanwhile established a highly successful solo career.

John Chinnery and drummer Roger Willis, who have known each other since childhood and are Arsenal FC fans, decided to reform The Magic Roundabout around February 1969 with John Elliott, who has been working in a bank since the band’s break up in September 1968.

The Kool, 1967, featuring Ray Brown (far left). Photo credit: Ray Brown
The Kool, 1967, featuring Ray Brown (far left). Photo credit: Ray Brown

Ray Brown, who had previously played with Jeff Curtis & The Flames and The Kool agreed to join after his next band, Champagne appeared on the same bill as The Magic Roundabout.

Ray Brown (centre) with Champagne in 1968. Photo credit: Ray Brown
Ray Brown (centre) with Champagne in 1968. Photo credit: Ray Brown

Lead guitarist Ian Hollands, who had previously played with Frankie Reid & The Casuals and The Legends answered an advert in the music press and completed the new formation.

The new Magic Roundabout formation now comprised:

Ian Hollands – lead guitar/vocals

John Chinnery – rhythm guitar/vocals

John Elliott – organ/vocals

Ray Brown – bass/vocals

Roger Willis – drums/vocals

 

The Magic Roundabout gigs (continued):

9 May 1969 – Harefield Youth Club, Harefield, Middlesex

17 May 1969 – R&B Club, Feltham, Middlesex

18 May 1969 – Cooks Ferry Inn, Edmonton, Middlesex

23 May 1969 – Lorraine Club, Chingford, Essex

31 May 1969 – Wake Arms, Epping, Essex

 

6 June 1969 – Salvatorian College, Wealdstone, Middlesex

7 June 1969 – White Hart, Tottenham

13 June 1969 – Lorraine Club, Chingford, Essex

21 June 1969 – Greenford Hotel, Greenford, Middlesex

27 June 1969 – Woodford Youth Club, St Barnabos School

28 June 1969 – St Annes School, Hanwell, Middlesex

 

3 July 1969 – New Penny Disco, Watford, Hertfordshire

4 July 1969 – Pinkwell Youth Centre, Hayes, Middlesex

6 July 1969 – Cambridge Hotel, Edmonton, Middlesex

12 July 1969 – Bourne School, Ruislip Manor, Middlesex

13 July 1969 – the Cherry Tree, Welwyn Garden City, Hertfordshire

18 July 1969 – King’s Head Disco, Harrow, Middlesex

19 July 1969 – Wake Arms, Epping, Essex

26 July 1969 – King’s Head, Harrow, Middlesex

 

1 August 1969 – Lorraine Club, Chingford, Essex

2 August 1969 – King’s Head, Harrow, Middlesex

7 August 1969 – Top Rank Suite, Watford, Hertfordshire

15 August 1969 – El Grotto, Ilford, Essex

16 August 1969 – Oldfield Tavern, Greenford, Middlesex

22 August 1969 – King’s Head, Harrow, Middlesex

23 August 1969 – Spa Ballroom, Cheltenham, Gloucestershire

24 August 1969 – Cambridge Hotel, Edmonton, Middlesex

30 August 1969 – Links Pavilion, Cromer, Norfolk

31 August 1969 – Industrial Club, Norwich, Norfolk

26 September 1969 – Greenford Hotel, Greenford, Middlesex

27 September 1969 – New Penny Disco, Watford, Hertfordshire

28 September 1969 – Oldfield Tavern, Greenford, Middlesex

 

3 October 1969 – King’s Head, Harrow, Middlesex

4 October 1969 – Oldfield Tavern, Greenford, Middlesex

10 October 1969 – Grange Youth Centre, Hayes, Middlesex

11 October 1969 – King’s Head, Harrow, Middlesex

24 October 1969 – Greenford Hotel, Greenford, Middlesex

25 October 1969 – Industrial Club, Norwich, Norfolk

 

1 November 1969 – King’s Head, Harrow, Middlesex

2 November 1969 – Oldfield Tavern, Greenford, Middlesex

7 November 1969 – King’s Head, Harrow, Middlesex

8 November 1969 – Oldfield Tavern, Greenford, Middlesex

9 November 1969 – Hunter’s Club, Horn Hotel, Braintree, Essex

14 November 1969 – Lorraine Club, Chingford, Essex

21 November 1969 – Kettering WMC, Kettering, Northamptonshire

28 November 1969 – Greenford Hotel, Greenford, Middlesex

 

5 December 1969 – King’s Head, Harrow, Middlesex

6 December 1969 – Oldfield Tavern, Greenford, Middlesex

7 December 1969 – Headstone Hotel, North Harrow, Middlesex

11 December 1969 – Oldfield Tavern, Greenford, Middlesex

12 December 1969 – Harefield Youth Club, Harefield, Middlesex

13 December 1969 – Greenford Hotel, Greenford, Middlesex

19 December 1969 – Greenford Hotel, Greenford, Middlesex

 

Magic Roundabout in 1969. Left to right: Ian Hollands, Ray Brown, John Chinnery and John Elliott. Photo credit: Ray Brown
Magic Roundabout in 1969. Left to right: Ian Hollands, Ray Brown, John Chinnery and John Elliott. Photo credit: Ray Brown

2 January 1970 – King’s Head, Harrow, Middlesex (Hollands ill)

8 January 1970 – Oldfield Tavern, Greenford, Middlesex (Hollands ill)

16 January 1970 – King’s Head, Harrow, Middlesex

17 January 1970 – Oldfield Tavern, Greenford, Middlesex

23 January 1970 – El Grotto Disco, Ilford, Essex

24 January 1970 – King’s Head, Harrow, Middlesex

30 January 1970 – Greenford Hotel, Greenford, Middlesex

 

7 February 1970 – Gillettes, Isleworth, Middlesex

8 February 1970 – Cambridge Hotel, Edmonton, Middlesex

12 February 1970 – Oldfield Hotel, Greenford, Middlesex

13 February 1970 – Cook’s Ferry Inn, Edmonton, Middlesex

14 February 1970 – King’s Head, Harrow, Middlesex

20 February 1970 – King’s Head, Harrow, Middlesex

22 February 1970 – Oldfield Hotel, Greenford, Middlesex

24 February 1970 – Civic Hall, St Albans, Hertfordshire

27 February 1970 – Greenford Hotel, Greenford, Middlesex

 

6 March 1970 – King’s Head, Harrow, Middlesex

7 March 1970 – Spotlight Club, RAF Brize Norton

12 March 1970 – Oldfield Hotel, Greenford, Middlesex

14 March 1970 – Civic Hall, St Albans, Hertfordshire

20 March 1970 – King’s Head, Harrow, Middlesex

21 March 1970 – Airmen’s Mess, USAF Wethersfield

26 March 1970 – Oldfield Hotel, Greenford, Middlesex

28 March 1970 – King’s Head, Harrow, Middlesex

 

Ray Brown (left) and Roger Willis on stage with Magic Roundabout. Photo credit: Ray Brown
Ray Brown (left) and Roger Willis on stage with Magic Roundabout. Photo credit: Ray Brown

3 April 1970 – AYA USAF West Ruislip, Middlesex

4 April 1970 – Andromeda Club, Colchester, Essex

10 April 1970 – King’s Head, Harrow, Middlesex

11 April 1970 – Oldfield Hotel, Greenford, Middlesex

16 April 1970 – Oldfield Hotel, Greenford, Middlesex

18 April 1970 – King’s Head, Harrow, Middlesex

19 April 1970 – Links, Borehamwood, Hertfordshire

24 April 1970 – West Ham College, West Ham

 

2 May 1970 – Airmen’s Club, USAF Mildenhall

9 May 1970 – Oldfield Hotel, Greenford, Middlesex

14 May 1970 – Oldfield Hotel, Greenford, Middlesex

26 May 1970 – Oldfield Hotel, Greenford, Middlesex

29 May 1970 – King’s Head, Harrow, Middlesex

30 May 1970 – NCOs Club, USAF High Wycombe

 

1 June 1970 – King’s Head, Edmonton (audition)

The band auditioned for the John Edwards Agency (most likely the above date), performing three songs, including a cover of The Moody Blues’ “Ride My See-Saw”.

 

The Magic Roundabout gigs (continued):

4 June 1970 – Galaxy Club, RAF Northwood

6 June 1970 – King’s Head, Harrow, Middlesex

13 June 1970 – Oldfield Hotel, Greenford, Middlesex

18 June 1970 – Oldfield Hotel, Greenford, Middlesex

19 June 1970 – King’s Head, Harrow, Middlesex

20 June 1970 – Braintree College, Braintree, Essex

26 June 1970 – Oases Club, RAF Biggin Hill, Kent

 

1 July 1970 – NCOs Club, USAF High Wycombe

3 July 1970 – Beaconsfield Youth Club

4 July 1970 – Airmen’s Annexe, USAF Upper Hayford

9 July 1970 – Angelique, King’s Road, London

10 July 1970 – King’s Head, Harrow, Middlesex

11 July 1970 – North Park, WMC, Kettering, Northamptonshire

15 July 1970 – Winston Churchill Hall, Ruislip, Middlesex

16 July 1970 – RAF High Wycombe

24 July 1970 – Spotlight Club, RAF Brize Norton

25 July 1970 – Pavilion, Hemel Hempstead, Hertfordshire

31 July 1970 – The Pheasantry, King’s Road, London

PLEASE NOTE: There are some missing gigs from this list. John Chinnery believes that the group played until at least November 1970.

Sometime in 1970, the new line up got the opportunity to record two tracks at Abbey Road, which are never released. One is a cover of a song called “Everything Under The Sun”. The other is an early cover of Neil Diamond’s “Red, Red Wine”.

Around October 1970, John Elliott was invited to sing lead on a backing track – the Findon, Shelley, Hazelwood and Hammond collaboration, “Dark Side of the Moon”. Incidentally, Elton John had earlier cut a version.

Not long after, the rest of the band was brought into the studio and recorded an instrumental track composed by Ian Hollands. For some reason, Ray Brown was not available and former member Roger Flavell, who named the track “Black Boots”, provided bass. However, the song was later credited to producers Ben Findon and Pete Shelley.

Tragically, the band’s career then came to a dramatic halt after returning from a gig in Bedford around late October/early November 1970. Stopping off at Toddington Services on the M1, the band’s roadies went into the service station to get some food and someone broke into the van and stole much of the band’s equipment. Only John Chinnery was insured!

All of the remaining the gigs were cancelled but The Magic Roundabout did play its final gig on 31 December 1970 on borrowed gear because the money (£100) was too good to give up.

In the meantime, Findon and Shelley brought John Elliott back into the studio to add more vocals to “Dark Side of the Moon”.

With the band no longer active and unable to use The Magic Roundabout name, the producers released the single on Decca in May 1971 under The Outer Limits name.

Ian Hollands later played with a group called Mobius. Ray Brown briefly played with a harmony group from Tooting from January-February1971 before joining Easy Virtue and then Crackers.

Roger Willis meanwhile joined Capability Brown in 1972. After several albums, Willis and two other band members joined Christie, which featured original Magic Roundabout bass player Roger Flavell in the group.

Willis later played with a number of groups, including Crazy Kat, before reuniting with Ray Brown in Crackers.

In recent years, John Chinnery, Roger Flavell, John Elliott and Lindsey Bex have held four reunions.

A huge thanks to John Chinnery and Lindsay Bex for providing the gig lists  (from Geoff Chinnery) and to Roger Flavell, John Chinnery, Lindsey Bex, John Elliott, Ray Brown and Ian Hollands for helping with the group’s history. Thank you Roger Flavell, Lindsay Bex and Ray Brown for photos.

Copyright © Nick Warburton, 2015. All Rights Reserved. No part of this article may be reproduced or transmitted in any from or by any means, without prior permission from the author. To contact the author, email: Warchive@aol.com or nick_warburton@hotmail.com

 

 

 

Tornado Records of Greensboro, NC

The Nomads
The Nomads

Nomads Tornado 45 Thoughts of a MadmanNorth Carolina had many record labels in the 1960’s, but few were as prolific as Tornado Records. Based in Greensboro, the label had offices at 1712 Farrell Avenue, but also did business via PO Drawer 6787.

Tornado’s stock in trade was regional Country & Western music, although artists from as far away as Pennsylvania and Maine were released by the label. Tornado was owned by David Lee Perkins, whose name appears frequently with author credits on many releases.

The years of operation for the label seem to have been rather compact, roughly estimated to range from late 1964 to mid-1967, referencing Mike Markesich’s excellent tome, “Teenbeat Mayhem.”

Caravans Tornado 45 Twistin', Rockin', BabyAlthough typically beyond the scope of Garage Hangover, Tornado registers in the minds of garage fans as the home of the second single by The Nomads of Mt. Airy, North Carolina. As far as Tornado was concerned, The Nomads were a “Sensational New Discovery,” and said just that right on the record label. “Thoughts of a Madman” b/w “From Zero Down” was released in April of 1967, and ranks high among garage rock enthusiasts nationwide. It was the Nomads second single, the first being on the Stark label profiled on this site.

Also of note are the Caravans from Greensboro. Their single, “Twistin’ Rockin’ Baby” b/w “Rainbow of Love” from a couple of years earlier rocks pretty well, with an occasionally cool, John Lennon-esque vocal on the A-side.

Profile of Tornado Records artist Gail Day, Feb. 2, 1967
Profile of Tornado Records artist Gail Day, Feb. 2, 1967

Tornado Records Discography (if anyone can help fill in the gaps, more power to them):

Tornado T-101 – Glenn Thompson “My Mary” / “What A Line”
Tornado T-102 – ?
Tornado T-103 – Dewey Ritter & the Panhandle Boys “I Walk A Lonely Road (Because of You)” / “Be My Sunshine Forever”
Tornado T-104 – South Mountain Boys “Gonna Hand You A Ticket” / “Dial My Number”
Tornado T-105 – Roy Baker & the South Mountain Boys “Jocassee Nona” / “Close As The Nearest Phone”
Tornado T-106 – Caravans “Twistin’ Rockin’ Baby” / “Rainbow of Love” (Greensboro)
Tornado T-107EP – Gloria Weston “Missing in Action (In Vietnam),” Kenny Craft “What A Fool Am I,” and Rod Rodgers “Hot Game of Dice” and “A Daughter Never Fools Her Mother”
Tornado T-108 – Joyce Mills “You’re Not the Boy I Used To Know” / ??
Tornado T-109 – ?

Harold Crosby
Harold Crosby

Tornado T-110 – Harold Crosby “Big Big Truck” / “I Will Mend Your Heartaches Tomorrow” (Maine)
Tornado T-111 – ?
Tornado T-112 – ?
Tornado T-113 – Dick Mosely “Cry No More” / “Wagons-Ho”
Tornado T-114 – ?
Tornado T-115 – ?
Tornado T-116 – ?
Tornado T-117 – ?
Tornado T-118 – Dick Mosely “Getting My Kicks in ’66” / ??
Tornado T-119 – Margie Lee “It’s Too Late” / “Let’s Fall In Love Together”
Tornado T-120 – ?
Tornado T-121 – Carl Pride “You Can’t Catch My Mustang” / “If I Don’t Miss You” (Greensboro)
Tornado T-122 – ?
Tornado T-123 – Larry Campbell & the Country Playboys “Break-Through” / “Bluegrass Mountain Home”
Tornado T-124 – Bobby Adkins & Allen Mills “Bluegrass in Kentucky” / “I’m So Sorry That I Threw Your Love Away”
Tornado T-125 – George Dry & the Daydreamers “One Lung Charlie” / ?? (PA)
Tornado T-126 – ?
Tornado T-127 – Joe Stone & Bobby Atkins “Singing Love Songs (Bluegrass Style)” / “Tears and Roses”
Tornado T-128 – ?
Tornado T-129 – Billy Beal “Rainy Day Blues” / “Cold, Dark And Deep”
Tornado T-130 – Tommy Jones & the Hayriders “Ballad of Gamblin’ Lil” / “God – Dollar”
Tornado T-131 – ?
Tornado T-132 – Joni Day “I Wonder If” / “Again He Said to Me” (PA)
Tornado T-133 – Johnny Jones “You’ve Turned Me Down” / “A Million Times”
Tornado T-134 – Harold Crosby “Bright Lights (and Blond Haired Women)” / “Let’s Fall in Love Together” (Maine)
Tornado T-135 – ?
Tornado T-136 – Joe Stone & Bobby Atkins “Stolen Kisses Are The Sweetest” / “Mister Bluegrass (Here’s To You)”
Tornado T-137 – Gail Day “Santa Didn’t Come” / “Please, Mr. Santa” (8 year old daughter of George and Joni Day) (PA)
Tornado T-138 – Bobby Adkins “Bluest Guy In Town” / “You Stopped Loving Me”
Tornado T-139 – Ray Josey “Orchids & Diamonds” / “Silver Tears”
Tornado T-140 – ?
Tornado TLP-141 – George & Joni Day EP “Tears In My Heart,” “Sorry,” “The One You Left Me For,” “Make Up Your Mind,” “Too Many – Too Few,” “We’ll Work It Out” (PA)
Tornado T-142 – ?
Tornado T-143 – Glenn Thompson “Bad, Bad Dream” / “Thirteen Stripes in Old Glory”
Tornado T-144 – Glenn Thompson “Walk Softly (You’re Walking On My Heart)” / “You Didn’t Want Me Yesterday (I Don’t Want You Today)”
Tornado T-145 – Hank Brooks & the Midnite Rangers “Big, Big Heart” / “Pretty Picture On My Wall”

Lefty Hales
Lefty Hales

Tornado T-146 – Lefty Hales & the Carolina Partners “Stop Me” / “Anywhere, Anytime” (Goldsboro)
Tornado T-147 – Mettie Lou “A Soldier’s Prayer” / ??
Tornado T-148 – Bobby Adkins “Soldier’s Return” / “There’s Not Enough Words”
Tornado T-149 – Tommy Jones & the Hayriders “The Commies Are Coming” / “Love Is A Mountain Of Gold”
Tornado T-150 – ?
Tornado T-151 – ?
Tornado T-152 – Garland Atkins & the Sunny Mountain Partners “I Miss You Most Of All” / “Singin’ The Blues”
Tornado T-153 – Tommy Harrell & the Country Valients “One Drink Too Many” / You Sure Got The Best Of Me” (Eastern NC)
Tornado T-154 – ?
Tornado T-155 – ?
Tornado T-156 – ?
Tornado T-157 – Cousin Lee & Little Hank EP “Lonely and Blue,” “Don’t Judge Another Person,” “Lifetime To Forget,” “Little Hank’s Shuffle”
Tornado T-158 – ?
Tornado T-159 – The Nomads “Thoughts Of A Madman” / “From Zero Down” (Mt. Airy)
Tornado T-160 – Glenn Thompson Sunshine Through The Rain” / “You’re Not The Girl I Used To Know”
Tornado T-161 – Dick Mosely “Truck Stop Number Three” / “Under the Double Eagle”
Tornado T-162 – Billy Beal  “A Lifetime to Forget”  /  “Queen Without a Throne”
Tornado T-163 – Bobby Adkins “Ballad of Gamblin’ Lil” / “What About My Blue Heart”
Tornado T-164 – Bobby Adkins “Miss Thirteen, Teenage Queen” / “Day of God’s Wrath”
Glenn Thompson Tornado LP Best OfTornado T-165 – ?
Tornado T-166 – Glenn Thompson “Where The Red River Flows” / “King of the Endless Highways”

One Tornado LP has been identified thus far:

Tornado LP-102 The Best of Glenn Thompson

Thanks to Chris Bishop for additions, Lightnin’ Wells, Bob Clere for jpegs and helpful comments, and to Mike Markesich for key dates.

Glenn Thompson Tornado 45 What a LineGeorge Dry & the Daydreamers Tornado 45 One-Lung Charlie

Tommy Jones & the Hayriders Tornado 45 The Commies Are CommingCarl Pride Tornado 45 You Can't Catch My Mustang

The Nomads
The Nomads
The Nomads
The Nomads

The site for '60s garage bands since 2004