The Dantes Jamie 45 Can't Get Enough Of Your Love

The Dantes

The Dantes Jamie 45 Can't Get Enough Of Your LoveThe Dantes Jamie 45 80-96I found mint copies of the first two 45s by the Dantes in company sleeves, and they were so cool I had to put scans of them up on the site with something about this quintessential mid-60s band.

Barry Hayden – lead vocals
Dave Workman – lead guitar
Lynn Wehr – rhythm guitar
Carter Holliday – bass
Joe Hinton – drums

The Dantes formed about 1964 in Columbus, Ohio suburb of Worthington. Though they drew inspiration from the Rolling Stones and covered Stones songs live and on their records, their first single displays an original and catchy style. “Can’t Get Enough of Your Love” begins with quick finger picking more like something from the Byrds until the opening vocals come blasting out at the listener. The rhythm section chugs along with a sound peculiar to styrene discs.

Although it made #1 on Columbia station WCOL, the single didn’t break out nationally. Song writing credits are to Harvey-Wehr for Doraflo Music BMI, arranged by lead guitarist Dave Workman.

The flip “80-96″ starts out like the Yardbirds’ “I Ain’t Done Wrong” then settles into a bluesy instrumental. According to Buckeye Beat the band wanted to call this song “8-69″ but Jamie insisted it was too suggestive a title. Writing credits are to Dantes-Weber. Released in March 1966 on Jamie 1314, both sides are listed as “A Sire Production for B.J.R. Productions”.

According to an article in the Mansfield News-Journal, their manager was DJ Johnny Garber, while a later article from January 1968 discusses Garber and Chuck Swisher co-managing the group.

The Dantes Cameo 45 Can I Get a WitnessIn late September, 1966 the Dantes released their second 45, this time on the Cameo label, a cover of the Stones “Under My Thumb” with a good version of “Can I Get a Witness” (which the Stones also did) on Cameo 431, the labels reading “a Richards Production”.

An article in the Newark Advocate from May 9, 1968 mentions Dave Workman had left the band and formed Dave Workman’s Blues Group with other Columbus musicians. Dave’s leaving may have led to a softening of the band’s sound, evident on their last 45 in October 1968. Featuring horns and a pop sound, the A-side was a cover of another Stones song, “Connection” backed with the band original “Satisfied”. Walt Masky produced the record, coordinated by Jerry Sharell; it was released on the Main Line label.

The band lasted until about January 1969, at which point they changed their name to Moonstone. The Circleville Herald has an ad for one Moonstone gig in January with the Fifth Order and the Young Generation, and another in April ’69 with the Tree and the Fifth Order. After this Moonstone and the Dantes seem to disappear.

Any photos or info on the band would be appreciated.

The Dantes Cameo 45 Under My Thumb

Black Prince Hotel, Bexley, Kent

The Black Prince Hotel in Bexley, Kent was a popular live music venue during the 1960s. I’ve started to compile a list of artists that performed there and would welcome any additions as well as any memories of the pub.

12 April 1964 – Graham Bond Organisation

17 May 1964 – Graham Bond Organisation

21 June 1964 – Graham Bond Organisation

12 September 1964 – Graham Bond Organisation

18 October 1964 – Graham Bond Organisation
29 October 1964 – Graham Bond Organisation

28 February 1965 – Rod Stewart & The Soul Agents with Buddy Guy

29 August 1965 – John Mayall’s Bluesbreakers

30 January 1966 – Spencer Davis Group

6 February 1966 – Alex Harvey
13 February 1966 – Graham Bond Organisation (with Big Wheel Soul Band?)
27 February 1966 – Zoot Money & The Big Roll Band

6 March 1966 – The Action
27 March 1966 – Steampacket

5 June 1966 – Downliners Sect

3 July 1966 – Geno Washington & The Ram Jam Band

21 August 1966 – Shotgun Express

4 September 1966 – The Moody Blues
11 September 1966 – Cliff Bennett & The Rebel Rousers
18 September 1966 – Zoot Money & The Big Roll Band

20 November 1966 – Downliner’s Sect

14 March 1967 – Carl Douglas & The Big Stampede

9 April 1967 – Julie Driscoll and Brian Auger & The Trinity
25 April 1967 – Jimmy Cliff (with The Shakedown Sound)

30 May 1967 – The Nite People

2 July 1967 – The Coloured Raisins

3 September 1967 – The Amboy Dukes
10 September 1967 – John Mayall’s Bluesbreakers

8 October 1967 – The Amboy Dukes

7 November 1967 – Carl Douglas & The Big Stampede
12 November 1967 – Dantalion’s Chariot

5 May 1968 – Spooky Tooth

9 June 1968 – Julie Driscoll, Brian Auger & The Trinity
23 June 1968 – Spooky Tooth

4 August 1968 – Spooky Tooth

15 September 1968 – Ten Years After
22 September 1968 – Timebox

10 December 1968 – Simon K & The Meantimers

27 June 1969 – The Symbols

10 August 1969 – Trapeze

19 October 1969 – The Greatest Show on Earth

9 November 1969 – Timebox

Sources:

South East London Mercury, Marmalade Skies website, Melody Maker, Fabulous 208 and Bruno Ceriotti (Graham Bond Organisation)

The Scotch of St James

The Scotch of St James, situated at 13A Masons Yard, Westminster was a notable music venue in the 1960s and a popular hang out for rock musicians, notably The Beatles and The Rolling Stones.

Jimi Hendrix also made his first UK appearance at the club on 24 September 1966 when he joined the house band for a few numbers.

I have started to compile a list of artists that performed at the venue and would welcome any additions as well as memories of the club.

7 May 1965 – The Stormville Shakers
14-15 May 1965 – The Stormville Shakers

22 October 1965 – The Riot Squad

26 July 1966 – The Loose Ends

11 September 1966 – The Iveys
28 September 1966 – Brian Auger & The Trinity
30 September 1966 – VIPs

19 October 1966 – Paul Butterfield Blues Band jams with Cream (either here or Cromwellian)
25 October 1966 – Jimi Hendrix Experience

23 April 1967 – The Wages of Sin

1-3 November 1967 – The Anglians
4 November 1967 – Mud
6-8 November 1967 – The Web
10-11 November 1967 – West Coast Consortium
13-16 November 1967 – Timebox
28-30 November 1967 – Bystanders

30 December 1967 – Kaleidoscope

2 May 1968 – Ray King Soul Band
16 May 1968 – Edwin Starr

17 June 1968 – Ray King Soul Band

3 August 1968 – Scrugg
5 August 1968 – Dave Davani Five
6 August 1968 – Tim Rose
13 August 1968 – Elmer Gantry
21 August 1968 – Dave Davani Five
22 August 1968 – Timebox
26 August 1968 – Timebox

7 September 1968 – Scrugg
14 September 1968 – Scrugg
27-28 September 1968 – Scrugg

16 October 1968 – The New Formula

12 November 1968 – The New Formula
18 November 1968 – The New Formula

12 December 1968 – The New Formula
18 December 1968 – The Barrier

31 January 1969 – The N’ Betweens

Sources:

Melody Maker, Marmalade Skies website and the Stormville Shakers website. Thanks also to Jack Russell for the Scrugg gigs.

Mustache Wax Inner 45 I'm Gonna Get You

Mustache Wax

Mustache Wax Inner 45 I'm Gonna Get YouDaniel Lane (Danny Lutzky) – guitar
Richie Winston – 6 and 12 string guitar
David Knopf – bass
Lloyd Goldberg – drums and lead vocals
Eddie DiBiase – harmonica

I was very excited to track down a copy of this 45 only find it to be in nearly unplayable condition – if anyone has a nice spare please contact me!

Mustache Wax came from the Bronx, in Riverdale. This was the last of several lineups and band names they used before breaking up after high school. They recorded the 45 in a studio on 42nd St.

Eddie DiBiase came from Queens and was the connection to Inner Records, though I can’t find any other releases on that label. Eddie wrote the top site, “I’m Gonna Get You” published by Luv Music ASCAP.

Mustache Wax Inner 45 On My MindI also like the flip, “On My Mind” alternately somber and quick, written by guitarist Danny Lane for Philonic Music, BMI.

The 45 was produced by Epstein-Schwartzberg, yet it’s also “A Vitale-Eden Production”.

Anyone have a photo of the group?

Info from David Knopf via Flower Bomb Songs.

El Partido, Lewisham

The El Partido in Lewisham, southeast London was located at 8-10 Lee High Road and was a popular spot for young Jamaicans and local mods.

The excellent Transpontine website notes that King Ossie Sound played at the club regularly. Other guests included Jamaicans Jimmy Cliff and The Duke Reid Sound.

Local R&B outfit, The Loose Ends, who cut two singles for Decca, were also house band at some point in late 1965.

I have started a gig list and would welcome any additions plus any memories of the venue, which was closed down in April 1967.

17 October 1965 – Bo Diddley

28 January 1966 – Lee Dorsey
30 January 1966 – The Drifters

11 February 1966 – Doris Troy
12 February 1966 – Inez and Charlie Foxx

8 April 1966 – Jimmy Cliff (backed by New Generation?) with The Raisons, King Ossie Sound and Duke Reid
9 April 1966 – New Jump Band with King Ossie Sound
10 April 1966 – Don Covey with King Ossie Sound
11 April 1966 – Owen Gray and Jackie Edwards with The Raisons and King Ossie Sound

22 May 1966 – The Charmers (with Carl Douglas)

11 June 1966 – Carl Douglas & The Charmers

4 August 1966 – Jimmy Cliff

2 September 1966 – James Royal Set
24 September 1966 – Carl Douglas & The Big Stampede

1 October 1966 – Timebox

15 November 1966 – The Iveys

6 January 1967 – Duke Lee
7 January 1967 – The Soul Trinity
13 January 1967 – Duke Lee
14 January 1967 – The Mellow Notes
20 January 1967 – Duke Lee
21 January 1967 – Ossie Layne & The Red Hot Band

Sources: 

Southeast London Mercury, Marmalade Skies website and Melody Maker

Glenlyn Ballroom, Forest Hill

Located at 15 Perry Vale, the Glenlyn Ballroom in Forest Hill, Southeast London was a popular venue for Mods in the early-to-mid 1960s.

The Who were regulars in the 1963-1964 period when they were known as The Detours and The High Numbers.

I’ve started a list of bands that were advertised and would welcome any additions as well as any memories of the venue.

 

13 September 1963 – The Detours (became The Who)

4 October 1963 – The Detours (became The Who)
11 October 1963 – The Detours (became The Who)

7 November 1963 – The Detours (became The Who)

6 December 1963 – The Detours (became The Who)
20 December 1963 – The Detours (became The Who)

3 January 1964 – The Detours (became The Who)
24 January 1964 – The Detours (became The Who)
31 January 1964 – The Detours (became The Who)

14 February 1964 – The Detours (or now called The Who)

16 March 1964 – The Who
23 March 1964 – The Who

3 April 1964 – The Who (this month they change name to High Numbers)
6 April 1964 – The High Numbers
10 April 1964 – The High Numbers
20 April 1964 – The High Numbers
24 April 1964 – The High Numbers

4 May 1964 – The High Numbers
11 May 1964 – The High Numbers
15 May 1964 – The High Numbers
18 May 1964 – The High Numbers
25 May 1964 – The High Numbers

1 June 1964 – The High Numbers
8 June 1964 – The High Numbers
15 June 1964 – The High Numbers
22 June 1964 – The High Numbers
29 June 1964 – The High Numbers (revert back to The Who in November)

6 November 1964 – The Graham Bond Organisation

15 January 1966 – The Birds
21 January 1966 – The Who

26 February 1966 – The Loose Ends

19 June 1966 – The Carl Douglas Set

8 July 1966 – Dave Antony’s Moods
29 July 1966 – The Loose Ends

August 1966 – The Fenmen
August 1966 – The Creed with Graham Bell & The Trend

September 1966 – Dave Antony’s Moods
23 September 1966 – The Creation

10 March 1967 – Carl Douglas & The Big Stampede
17 March 1967 – Tony Rivers & The Castaways
18 March 1967 – The Escorts
24 March 1967 – The Summer Set
25 March 1967 – The Cossacks
31 March 1967 – Jimmy Frog & The Bean Machine

Sources: 

South East London Mercury, Marmalade Skies, Melody Maker and Andy Neill (The Who)

Chislehurst Caves, Chislehurst

Chislehurst Caves in the south eastern suburbs of London is a 22 miles long series of tunnels. During the 1960s, the caves were used as a music venue and many notable artists played there, including David Bowie, Jimi Hendrix and Pink Floyd, to name a few.

I have started to compile a list of artists that played and would welcome any additions. Also, I would welcome any memories of the caves from that period.

11 February 1966 – Downliner’s Sect (opened the caves as a music venue)
25 February 1966 – Zoot Money & The Big Roll Band

11 March 1966 – The Loose Ends

1 July 1966 – The Yardbirds

16 December 1966 – The Jimi Hendrix Experience

6 January 1967 – Carl Douglas & The Big Stampede
27 January 1967 – Jimi Hendrix Experience

17 February 1967 – Carl Douglas & The Big Stampede

14 April 1967 – Carl Douglas & The Big Stampede

7 July 1967 – Carl Douglas & The Big Stampede

6 October 1967 – Eric Burdon & The New Animals

9 February 1968 – The Herd

Sources:

South East London Mercury, Marmalade Skies, Melody Maker and Fabulous 208

The In Mates Palladium 45 The Same

The In Mates

The In Mates Palladium 45 The SameI have no info on the In Mates other than their origin of Kearns, Utah, a suburb southwest of Salt Lake City and the names on this 45. Randy Teal wrote “London Town” and Sam Parsons wrote “The Same”. Both songs are steady ’60s pop with harmony vocals and a good balance between the clean guitar work, organ and the rhythm section. Both songs have a touch of melancholy; “London Town” has a richer arrangement and harmonies, while “The Same” is more upbeat.

This 45 was released in January, 1967 on Palladium P-5011. I don’t know of any other releases on this Palladium label (there were others). Publishing by Le Mon Music, BMI.

Below is a stream of “London Town”. I can’t find “The Same” on the ‘net.

The In Mates Palladium 45 London Town

The Cromwellian

Located at 3 Cromwell Road in the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea, the Cromwellian Club was a notable London rock venue that was opened in 1964 by entrepreneur Tony Mitchell and part owned and managed by Bob Archer, who later established the Pantiles club in Bagshot, Surrey.

Brian Auger who played there with The Trinity claims that the Cromwellian is where Jimi Hendrix made his first British appearance after arriving in London in September 1966. At its height in 1966-1967, it also hosted numerous jam sessions, featuring the likes of Chris Farlowe, Georgie Fame, Long John Baldry, Eric Burdon and Eric Clapton among others.

I’ve started a list below of advertised gigs. I would welcome any comments about the club and any other gigs that are missing from this list.

6 August 1965 – Stormville Shakers
14 August 1965 – Stormville Shakers

8 September 1965 – Stormville Shakers
11 September 1965 – Stormville Shakers
16 September 1965 – Stormville Shakers
25 September 1965 – Stormville Shakers

1 October 1965 – Stormville Shakers
7 October 1965 – Stormville Shakers

15 January 1966 – The Riot Squad

30 July 1966 – The Riot Squad

20 September 1966 – Dave Antony’s Moods

19 October 1966 – Paul Butterfield Blues Band possibly jams with Cream here (or otherwise Scotch of St James)

16 November 1966 – Mike Cotton Sound
18 November 1966 – Carl Douglas & The Big Stampede

7 December 1966 – Carl Douglas & The Big Stampede
14 December 1966 – Carl Douglas & The Big Stampede
24 December 1966 – Carl Douglas & The Big Stampede

20 February 1967 – Carl Douglas & The Big Stampede

4 May 1967 – The Web
15 May 1967 – Mike Cotton Sound with Lucas
17 May 1967 – The Web
22 May 1967 – The Web
24 May 1967 – Mike Cotton Sound with Lucas
31 May 1967 – The Web

13 June 1967 – Mike Cotton Sound with Lucas
20 June 1967 – Mike Cotton Sound with Lucas

4 July 1967 – Mike Cotton Sound with Lucas
13 July 1967 – Mike Cotton Sound with Lucas
31 July 1967 – Mike Cotton Sound with Lucas

9 August 1967 – Mike Cotton Sound with Lucas

10 January 1968 – The Web featuring John L Watson
11 January 1968 – The Shevelles
12 January 1968 – Garnett Simms
15 January 1968 – Red Onion Jazz Band
17-19 January 1968 –The New Formula
22 January 1968 – Ken Colyer’s Jazzmen
23-24 January 1968 ¬– The Shevelles
25 January 1968 – Tuesday’s Children
26 January 1968 – Jigsaw
29 January 1968 – Spencer’s Washboard Kings
30 January 1968 – Mike Cotton Sound and Lucas
31 January 1968 – Wee Willie Harris and The Shevelles

1 February 1968 – The Web featuring John L Watson
2 February 1968 – Clyde McPhatter and The Trend
5 February 1968 – Alex Welsh & His Jazz Band
6 February 1968 – Wishful Thinking
14 February 1968 – Tremeloes
26 February 1968 – Jethro Tull

4 March 1968 – Fleetwood Mac
5 March 1968 – Mike Cotton Sound and Lucas
11 March 1968 – Spirit of John Morgan
18 March 1968 – Ten Years After
25-26 March 1968 – Julian Covey & The Machine
26 March 1968 – Jethro Tull

22 April 1968 – The Showstoppers
25 April 1968 – Nepenthe and Jigsaw
26 April 1968 – My Dear Watson
29 April 1968 – Duster Bennett
30 April 1968 – Timebox

1 May 1968 – O’Hara’s Playboys
2 May 1968 – Timebox
3 May 1968 – Duane Eddy
6 May 1968 – Wishful Thinking
7 May 1968 – Jeff Beck Group
8-9 May 1968 – The New Formula
10 May 1968 – Hopscotch
11 May 1968 – Merlin Q
13 May 1968 – The Fantastics
14 May 1968 – Embers
15 May 1968 – O’ Hara’s Playboys
16 May 1968 – The New Formula
17 May 1968 – Timebox
18 May 1968 – Brass Tacks
20-21 May 1968 – Wishful Thinking
22 May 1968 – Timebox
28 May 1968 – Duane Eddy

3 June 1968 – Bill Haley & The Comets
14 June 1968 – Ruby & The Romantics
18 June 1968 – Ray King Soul Band

2 August 1968 – Dave Davani Five
3 August 1968 – Timebox
8 August 1968 – Dave Davani Five
10 August 1968 – Pathfinders
15 August 1968 – Dave Davani Five
16 August 1968 – Scrugg
20 August 1968 – Timebox
23 August 1968 – Dave Davani Five
24 August 1968 – Scrugg
27 August 1968 – Timebox
28 August 1968 – Dave Davani Five
30 August 1968 – Dave Davani Five
31 August 1968 – Timebox

7 September 1968 – Timebox
14 September 1968 – The New Formula
16 September 1968 – The New Formula
17 September 1968 – Little John & The Shaddocks
18 September 1968 – Timebox
19 September 1968 – Katch 22
21 September 1968 – The New Formula

21 October 1968 – Maddening Crowd

16 November 1968 – Maddening Crowd
21 November 1968 – Nite People

19 December 1968 – Ray King Soul Band

10 November 1969 – She Trinity

Sources

Fabulous 208 Magazine, Melody Maker, Ken Baxter (Carl Douglas & The Big Stampede), Jack Russell (Scrugg) and Bruno Ceriotti (Riot Squad). Thanks also to Mick Capewell and his Marmalade Skies website and the Stormville Shakers website.

 

 

SmashCrashBash on Friday at the Half Moon

SmashCrashBash Cocktail Slippers The Connection November 7, 2014This Friday, November 7, I’ll be spinning records with Jeff the Chef, formerly of the Empire Soul Club at this month’s SmashCrashBash at the Half Moon on Front Street in Hudson, NY. Peter Aaron of the Chrome Cranks has been hosting these parties for over a year now. Records sound amazing on this sound system in this room, it’s a pleasure to spin for it. The night starts at 9:00, admission is $8.

This night’s bands will be the Cocktail Slippers from Norway with the Connection from Portsmouth, New Hampshire.

The site for '60s garage bands since 2004